Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD)

Overview

The Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy provides advanced preparation for education practitioners with leadership and policy responsibilities in both formal and nonformal settings. These settings include, among many others, the post-secondary sector, business and health organizations, unions, and community groups, as well as the K-12 school system.

What makes the program unique?

The program is grounded in the belief that it is important for participants to engage in scholarly discourse about understanding, critiquing, and improving practice in educational settings. It consists of six required seminars, two elective courses, a comprehensive examination, and a dissertation. While the program addresses Canadian educational issues and perspectives in a global context, it is the particular settings and leadership or policy responsibilities of the participants that are the starting points of seminars. The expertise of qualified adjunct faculty from related professional fields supplements that of the regular faculty members.

Program Structure

Students are admitted to the Ed.D. in cohorts of 10 to 15 and proceed as a group through required courses and the comprehensive examination which occurs at the end of Year 2. Students then propose and execute their dissertation research projects. Students must complete all program requirements within six years of initial enrolment. Required courses are offered on campus for two consecutive Summer Sessions (July to mid-August) and two consecutive Winter Sessions (on weekends from September to early April).

 

Program Enquiries

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Admission Information & Requirements

Program Instructions

Please ensure you follow the instructions in the online application system. After submitting your application, it is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that all supporting materials are submitted properly and by the application deadline. The Admissions Committee will only review complete applications. You can check the status of your application and supporting materials through the online application system.

1) Check Eligibility

Minimum Academic Requirements

The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies establishes the minimum admission requirements common to all applicants, usually a minimum overall average in the B+ range (76% at UBC). The graduate program that you are applying to may have additional requirements. Please review the specific requirements for applicants with credentials from institutions in:

Each program may set higher academic minimum requirements. Please review the program website carefully to understand the program requirements. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission as it is a competitive process.

English Language Test

Applicants from a university outside Canada in which English is not the primary language of instruction must provide results of an English language proficiency examination as part of their application. Tests must have been taken within the last 24 months at the time of submission of your application.

Minimum requirements for the two most common English language proficiency tests to apply to this program are listed below:

TOEFL: Test of English as a Foreign Language - internet-based

Overall score requirement: 92

Reading

22

Writing

22

Speaking

22

Listening

22

IELTS: International English Language Testing System

Overall score requirement: 6.5

Reading

6.0

Writing

6.0

Speaking

6.0

Listening

6.0

Other Test Scores

Some programs require additional test scores such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Test (GMAT). The requirements for this program are:

The GRE is not required.

Prior degree, course and other requirements

Document Requirements

Letter of Intent; Writing Sample; Professional resume or CV

2) Meet Deadlines

Application open dates and deadlines for an upcoming intake have not yet been configured in the admissions system. Please check back later.

3) Prepare Application

Transcripts

All applicants have to submit transcripts from all past post-secondary study. Document submission requirements depend on whether your institution of study is within Canada or outside of Canada.

Letters of Reference

A minimum of three references are required for application to graduate programs at UBC. References should be requested from individuals who are prepared to provide a report on your academic ability and qualifications.

Statement of Interest

Many programs require a statement of interest, sometimes called a "statement of intent", "description of research interests" or something similar.

Supervision

Students in research-based programs usually require a faculty member to function as their supervisor. Please follow the instructions provided by each program whether applicants should contact faculty members.

Instructions regarding supervisor contact for Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD)
The program will review research interests of applicants and recommend/match faculty members during the application/evaluation process. Applicants should not reach out to faculty members directly.

Citizenship Verification

Permanent Residents of Canada must provide a clear photocopy of both sides of the Permanent Resident card.

4) Apply Online

All applicants must complete an online application form and pay the application fee to be considered for admission to UBC.

Tuition & Financial Support

Financial Support

Applicants to UBC have access to a variety of funding options, including merit-based (i.e. based on your academic performance) and need-based (i.e. based on your financial situation) opportunities.

Scholarships & awards (merit-based funding)

All applicants are encouraged to review the awards listing to identify potential opportunities to fund their graduate education. The database lists merit-based scholarships and awards and allows for filtering by various criteria, such as domestic vs. international or degree level.

Teaching Assistantships (GTA)

Graduate programs may have Teaching Assistantships available for registered full-time graduate students. Full teaching assistantships involve 12 hours work per week in preparation, lecturing, or laboratory instruction although many graduate programs offer partial TA appointments at less than 12 hours per week. Teaching assistantship rates are set by collective bargaining between the University and the Teaching Assistants' Union.

Research Assistantships (GRA)

Many professors are able to provide Research Assistantships (GRA) from their research grants to support full-time graduate students studying under their direction. The duties usually constitute part of the student's graduate degree requirements. A Graduate Research Assistantship is a form of financial support for a period of graduate study and is, therefore, not covered by a collective agreement. Unlike other forms of fellowship support for graduate students, the amount of a GRA is neither fixed nor subject to a university-wide formula. The stipend amounts vary widely, and are dependent on the field of study and the type of research grant from which the assistantship is being funded. Some research projects also require targeted research assistance and thus hire graduate students on an hourly basis.

Financial aid (need-based funding)

Canadian and US applicants may qualify for governmental loans to finance their studies. Please review eligibility and types of loans.

All students may be able to access private sector or bank loans.

Foreign government scholarships

Many foreign governments provide support to their citizens in pursuing education abroad. International applicants should check the various governmental resources in their home country, such as the Department of Education, for available scholarships.

Working while studying

The possibility to pursue work to supplement income may depend on the demands the program has on students. It should be carefully weighed if work leads to prolonged program durations or whether work placements can be meaningfully embedded into a program.

International students enrolled as full-time students with a valid study permit can work on campus for unlimited hours and work off-campus for no more than 20 hours a week.

A good starting point to explore student jobs is the UBC Work Learn program or a Co-Op placement.

Tax credits and RRSP withdrawals

Students with taxable income in Canada may be able to claim federal or provincial tax credits.

Canadian residents with RRSP accounts may be able to use the Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) which allows students to withdraw amounts from their registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) to finance full-time training or education for themselves or their partner.

Please review Filing taxes in Canada on the student services website for more information.

Cost Calculator

Applicants have access to the cost calculator to develop a financial plan that takes into account various income sources and expenses.

Enrolment, Duration & Other Stats

These statistics show data for the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD). Data are separated for each degree program combination. You may view data for other degree options in the respective program profile.

Enrolment Data

 20202019201820172016
Applications35 2920 
Offers12 1412 
New registrations11 138 
Total enrolment4946504644

Completion Rates & Times

This program has a graduation rate of 40% based on 15 students admitted between 2007 - 2009. Based on 17 graduations between 2016 - 2019 the minimum time to completion is 3.83 years and the maximum time is 8.83 years with an average of 7.00 years of study. All calculations exclude leave times.
Disclaimer
Admissions data refer to all UBC Vancouver applications, offers, new registrants for each year, May to April [data updated: 22 April 2021]. Enrolment data are based on March 1 snapshots. Program completion data are only provided for datasets comprised of more than 4 individuals. Rates and times of completion depend on a number of variables (e.g. curriculum requirements, student funding), some of which may have changed in recent years for some programs [data updated: 29 October 2020].

Upcoming Doctoral Exams

Friday, 9 July 2021 - 9:00am

John Vernon Fleming
Stories of Educational Journeys and Leadership: Travelling Betwixt and Between

Research Supervisors

This list shows faculty members with full supervisory privileges who are affiliated with this program. It is not a comprehensive list of all potential supervisors as faculty from other programs or faculty members without full supervisory privileges can request approvals to supervise graduate students in this program.

  • Abdi, Ali (Citizenship and human rights education, International Development Education, Multi-centric Philosophies and Methodologies of Education, postcolonial studies in education, Social and Cultural Foundations of Education)
  • Ahenakew, Cash (Cultural studies, Higher Education, Indigenous Studies, Leadership and Organizations, Post-colonial studies, Race/ethnicity, Research methodologies, Social justice, Sociology of Education)
  • Andres, Lesley (Higher education; life course research; international comparative higher education; sociology of higher education)
  • Chan, Jennifer (transnational social movements, international and comparative education, Japanese civil society, Islam in multicultural societies, Adult education, Citizenship and democracy, Gender studies, International and Comparative Education, Multiculturalism, Post-colonial studies)
  • De Oliveira Andreotti, Vanessa (Education for/about international development, Social accountability in local and global engagements, Global Citizenship Education)
  • Ellis, Jason (Educational policy; Specialized studies in education; Education policy; history of education; Politics of education)
  • Fallon, Gerald (Indigenous Studies, International and Comparative Education, Leadership and Organizations, Policy, Research methodologies)
  • Gill, Hartej (Cultural studies, Leadership and Organizations, Post-colonial studies, Teaching and Practice)
  • Gleason, Mona (History, archaeology and related studies; history of education; history of children and youth; critical youth studies; gender and sexuality)
  • Kelly, Deirdre (Children and youth, Gender studies, Media and democracy, Social justice, Sociology of Education)
  • Mazawi, Andre (Citizenship and democracy, Higher education, International and Comparative Education, Leadership and organizations, Research methodologies, Sociology of Education)
  • Metcalfe, Amy (Educational policy; Higher education; Specialized studies in education; Campus Environments; Faculty; Higher Education; Imagery; Internationalization; Power and Organization; Science and Knowledge)
  • Poole, Wendy (Educational leadership and administration; Organizational change in education (reform of schooling); Teachers’ work; Teacher unions and teacher unionism; role of teacher unions in education, Leadership and organizations, Social justice, Teaching and Practice)
  • Rocha Perkerwicz, Samuel (Educational policy; Specialized studies in education; Philosophical Traditions in Education; philosophy of education)
  • Roman, Leslie (Ethnography, Cultural studies, Disability studies, Sociology of Education)
  • Ruitenberg, Claudia (Educational policy; Specialized studies in education; Educational Approaches; Environmental philosophy and education; Philosophical Traditions in Education; Political Contexts; Political education; discourse and translation; Professional Ethics; Social Impact of Artistic Education)
  • Shan, Hongxia (Other education, n.e.c.; Immigration and adult education and learning; Lifelong learning; Gender and work; Prof. learning)
  • Sork, Tom (Adult education, Lifelong learning, Teaching and Practice)
  • Stack, Michelle (Educational policy; Specialized studies in education; Adult Education and Continuing Education; Educational Context; Knowledge translation; Media and Society; media education; social justice and equity; student engagement; university rankings)
  • Stein, Sharon Rebekah (Educational policy; Higher education; Specialized studies in education; Educational theory; Global education; Higher Education; Indigenous studies; International and comparative education; International education; Pedagogy and education; Political economy of Higher Education; Post-colonial studies; Race/ethnicity; Social and Cultural Foundations of Education; Social justice; sustainability)
  • Taylor, Alison (Adult and continuing education, and community education; Educational administration, management and leadership; Educational policy; Higher education; Specialized studies in education; Education, Knowledge and Skills; Educational Context; Political Contexts; Social Contexts; Social Policies)
  • Vanwynsberghe, Robert (Citizenship and democracy, Social justice, Sustainability; Sustainability; Environmental Education; Theory and Method)

Pages

Doctoral Citations

A doctoral citation summarizes the nature of the independent research, provides a high-level overview of the study, states the significance of the work and says who will benefit from the findings in clear, non-specialized language, so that members of a lay audience will understand it.
Year Citation
2021 Dr. Allen explored the experience of precarious faculty members in British Columbian higher education institutions. Using auto ethnographic methods and an organizational culture theoretical framework, Dr. Allen made recommendations for senior leadership to foster more inclusivity with precarious faculty within higher education organizations.
2020 Dr. Mennigke wrote a philosophical inquiry on leadership in the age of liquid modernity. His dissertation critically analyses key themes in broad theoretical literature through a dramatic personification of each theme as a character. Using these themes as forms of conceptual analysis contributes a critical understanding of the nature of leadership.
2020 Educators make numerous judgments that affect vulnerable people every day, a responsibility for which there is little institutional training or support. Dr. Jensen explores Hannah Arendt's ideas about thinking, willing, and judging, and how these resources inform educational practice, helping educators to make ethical-political judgments.
2020 Dr. Bolderston studied the experiences of gay and lesbian radiation therapists coming out at work. Using an authoethnographic narrative inquiry approach, her findings showed that sexual orientation disclosure is dependent on context and can affect relationships with patients and co-workers in positive and negative ways.
2020 Dr. Soth examined the impact of a quality assurance program on dental hygiene care in BC. She found that the new program had little or no impact on practice and that the business culture of the workplace negatively impacted participants' ability to implement patient-centered care. The findings have implications for practitioners and regulators.
2019 Dr. LaPierre's community-based research with grade 12 Indigenous students examined their experiences and definitions of success. The study sheds light on Indigenous students' perceptions of success and how to create more suitable learning environments. The results of this study will inform practices in a range of public and Indigenous-led education systems.
2019 Dr. Maltesen engaged in a discourse analysis of how policies, perceptions and contexts create conditions for participation in Adult Basic Education at Vancouver Island University. She reveals that power and governmentality, located in welfare regimes and policy structures, bind thought and constrain action. Her findings will impact local practice.
2019 Dr. Younk examined the process by which a group of educational leaders from BC co-constructed their understandings of competencies in K-12 education. This study provides insight into how two current learning theories, activity theory and expansive learning theory, help us understand the complexities of systemic change.
2019 Dr. Vered explored how the management and professional staff at UBC make sense of their occupational and organizational identities. This research examines the positioning and challenges experienced by these employees and how more inclusive policies and practices can be developed and implemented within higher education.
2019 Dr. Sikkes studied Yukon's public school system during Yukon's transition to having provincial-type powers. He found that Yukon's constitutional and democratic development had direct effects on educational policy, especially school governance. His research will help inform the decision making of Yukon's present day educators and school leaders.

Pages

Further Information

Educational Leadership and Policy provides advanced preparation for education practitioners with leadership and policy responsibilities in both formal and nonformal settings. These settings include, among many others, the post-secondary sector, business and health organizations, unions, and community groups, as well as the K-12 school system.

Faculty Overview

Program Identifier

VGDEDD-G1
 
 
 
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