Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD)

Overview

The Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy provides advanced preparation for education practitioners with leadership and policy responsibilities in both formal and nonformal settings. These settings include, among many others, the post-secondary sector, business and health organizations, unions, and community groups, as well as the K-12 school system.

The program is grounded in the belief that it is important for participants to engage in scholarly discourse about understanding, critiquing, and improving practice in educational settings. It consists of six required seminars, two elective courses, a comprehensive examination, and a dissertation. While the program addresses Canadian educational issues and perspectives in a global context, it is the particular settings and leadership or policy responsibilities of the participants that are the starting points of seminars. The expertise of qualified adjunct faculty from related professional fields supplements that of the regular faculty members.

Students are admitted to the Ed.D. in cohorts of 10 to 15 and proceed as a group through required courses and the comprehensive examination which occurs at the end of Year 2. Students then propose and execute their dissertation research projects. Students must complete all program requirements within six years of initial enrolment. Required courses are offered on campus for two consecutive Summer Sessions (July to mid-August) and two consecutive Winter Sessions (on weekends from September to early April).

 
 

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Admission Information & Requirements

In order to apply to this program, the following components may be required.

Online Application

All applicants must complete an online application form and pay the application fee to be considered for admission to UBC.

Minimum Academic Requirements

The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies establishes the minimum admission requirements common to all applicants, usually a minimum overall average in the B+ range (76% at UBC). The graduate program that you are applying to may have additional requirements. Please review the specific requirements for applicants with credentials from institutions in:

Each program may set higher academic minimum requirements. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission as it is a competitve process.

Transcripts

All applicants have to submit transcripts from all past post-secondary study. Document submission requirements depend on whether your institution of study is within Canada or outside of Canada.

English Language Test

Applicants from a university outside Canada in which English is not the primary language of instruction must provide results of an English language proficiency examination as part of their application. Tests must have been taken within the last 24 months at the time of submission of your application.

Minimum requirements for the two most common English language proficiency tests to apply to this program are listed below:

92
22
22
22
22
6.5
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0

Other Test Scores

Some programs require additional test scores such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Test (GMAT). The requirements for this program are:

The GRE is not required.

Letters of Reference

A minimum of three references are required for application to graduate programs at UBC. References should be requested from individuals who are prepared to provide a report on your academic ability and qualifications. 

Statement of Interest

Many programs require a statement of interest, sometimes called a "statement of intent", "description of research interests" or something similar.

Supervision

Students in research-based programs usually require a faculty member to function as their supervisor. Please follow the instructions provided by each program whether applicants should contact faculty members.

Instructions regarding supervisor contact for Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD)
The program will review research interests of applicants and recommend/match faculty members during the application/evaluation process. Applicants should not reach out to faculty members directly.

Document Requirements

Letter of Intent; Writing Sample; Professional resume or CV

Citizenship Verification

Permanent Residents of Canada must provide a clear photocopy of both sides of the Permanent Resident card.

Application Notes

Please ensure you follow the instructions in the online application system. After submitting your application, it is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that all supporting materials are submitted properly and by the application deadline. The Admissions Committee will only review complete applications. You can check the status of your application and supporting materials through the online application system.

Deadline Details

Application Deadline

Deadline to submit online application. No changes can be made to the application after submission.

Transcript Deadline

Deadline to upload scans of official transcripts through the applicant portal in support of a submitted application. Information for accessing the applicant portal will be provided after submitting an online application for admission.

Referee Deadline

Deadline for the referees identified in the application for admission to submit references. See Letters of Reference for more information.

July 2021 Intake

Application Open Date
01 August 2020
Canadian Applicants
Application Deadline: 15 November 2020
Transcript Deadline: 15 November 2020
Referee Deadline: 22 November 2020
International Applicants
Application Deadline: 15 November 2020
Transcript Deadline: 15 November 2020
Referee Deadline: 22 November 2020

Tuition & Financial Support

Financial Support

Applicants to UBC have access to a variety of funding options, including merit-based (i.e. based on your academic performance) and need-based (i.e. based on your financial situation) opportunities.

Scholarships & awards (merit-based funding)

All applicants are encouraged to review the awards listing to identify potential opportunities to fund their graduate education. The database lists merit-based scholarships and awards and allows for filtering by various criteria, such as domestic vs. international or degree level.

Teaching and Research Assistantships

Student service appointments are intended to help qualified graduate students meet the cost of their studies at the University. Student appointments may involve part-time duties in teaching, research, or other academic activities.

Financial aid (need-based funding)

Canadian and US applicants may qualify for governmental loans to finance their studies. Please review eligibility and types of loans.

All students may be able to access private sector or bank loans.

Foreign government scholarships

Many foreign governments provide support to their citizens in pursuing education abroad. International applicants should check the various governmental resources in their home country, such as the Department of Education, for available scholarships.

Working while studying

The possibility to pursue work to supplement income may depend on the demands the program has on students. It should be carefully weighed if work leads to prolonged program durations or whether work placements can be meaningfully embedded into a program.

International students enrolled as full-time students with a valid study permit can work on campus for unlimited hours and work off-campus for no more than 20 hours a week.

A good starting point to explore student jobs is the UBC Work Learn program or a Co-Op placement.

Tax credits and RRSP withdrawals

Students with taxable income in Canada may be able to claim federal or provincial tax credits.

Canadian residents with RRSP accounts may be able to use the Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) which allows students to withdraw amounts from their registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) to finance full-time training or education for themselves or their partner.

Please review Filing taxes in Canada on the student services website for more information.

Cost Calculator

Applicants have access to the cost calculator to develop a financial plan that takes into account various income sources and expenses.

Enrolment, Duration & Other Stats

These statistics show data for the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD). Data are separated for each degree program combination. You may view data for other degree options in the respective program profile.

Enrolment Data

 20192018201720162015
Applications 2920 29
Offers 1412 16
New registrations 138 12
Total enrolment4650464453

Completion Rates & Times

This program has a graduation rate of 47.62% based on 21 students admitted between 2006 - 2009. Based on 18 graduations between 2015 - 2018 the minimum time to completion is 3.83 years and the maximum time is 8.83 years with an average of 6.88 years of study. All calculations exclude leave times.
Disclaimer
Admissions data refer to all UBC Vancouver applications, offers, new registrants for each year, May to April [data updated: 10 March 2020]. Enrolment data are based on March 1 snapshots. Program completion data are only provided for datasets comprised of more than 4 individuals. Rates and times of completion depend on a number of variables (e.g. curriculum requirements, student funding), some of which may have changed in recent years for some programs [data updated: 27 October 2019].

Research Supervisors

Doctoral Citations

A doctoral citation summarizes the nature of the independent research, provides a high-level overview of the study, states the significance of the work and says who will benefit from the findings in clear, non-specialized language, so that members of a lay audience will understand it.
Year Citation
2017 As educators we are asked to know ourselves in order to teach. Dr. Rego used a narrative approach to write her story of being a student and a teacher with mental illness. Her research is an invitation and a pedagogical tool for new teachers to look at their own stories and histories as they develop their educational practice.
2016 Dr. Elser examined Aboriginal parental engagement in the Calgary Catholic School District from a multiple of perspectives. Her findings revealed parental engagement as a process of reciprocal relationship building that considers Aboriginal social context as well as culture, language and values. These results will be useful for K-12 education.
2016 Dr. Hobenshield explored the Indigenous practice of gift giving. Her research identified specific Indigenous principles embedded within this tradition that inform a particular way of knowing. This information can be used to support the work of Indigenization in post-secondary education.
2016 Dr. Riedel explored how international practicums in Teacher Education impacted the understanding of good teaching practices for beginning teachers. She found these settings challenged assumptions in ways that rarely happen in home-country settings. Her findings emphasize the value of internationalizing Teacher Education in substantive ways.
2016 Dr. Skipper studied how teachers develop insights and knowledge about their practice. He examined personal, professional and social influences that contribute to individual understandings of teaching. His research addresses the complex considerations that drive teacher professional identities.
2016 What roles should digital technologies have in universities? Dr. Gratham's research found that answers were related to place in the system. He found that policy treats technologies as means to a more efficient and competitive system. In contrast, many professors experience technologies as distracting to their aims of building relationships with students.
2016 Dr. Daniels compared the personal memories from Aboriginal students of public schools and of Indian residential schools. By examining these intergenerational memories, she gained insights into Indigenous peoples' education in Canada. This research opens up possibilities for decolonizing present-day educational research, policies and practices.
2015 Dr. Wilbur explored the understandings that teachers of English as an Additional Language bring to teaching students whom they believe have experienced trauma. Her project described the ways instructors create inclusive classrooms. She concluded that for programs to be responsive to the whole student there needs to be a shift in policy and practice.
2015 Dr. Bepple studied the strategies used by international post-secondary students to obtain work in Canada after graduation. In addition to academic knowledge, those students want to acquire work-based skills, relationships, cultural understanding and credentials. She concludes that the students benefit from experiential learning opportunities.
2015 Dr. Suderman showed that the National Survey of Student Engagement is not currently designed to meet the diverse perspectives of international undergraduate students. Her study used extensive focus group analysis and the findings will influence international student development in higher education and research on student engagement theory.

Pages

Further Program Information

Educational Leadership and Policy provides advanced preparation for education practitioners with leadership and policy responsibilities in both formal and nonformal settings. These settings include, among many others, the post-secondary sector, business and health organizations, unions, and community groups, as well as the K-12 school system.

Faculty Overview

Program Identifier

VGDEDD-G1
 
 

July 2021 Intake

Application Open Date
01 August 2020
Canadian Applicant Deadline
15 November 2020
International Applicant Deadline
15 November 2020
 

Supervisor Search

 

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