Events

Wednesday, 26 January 2022 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm

This is the third session in the Graduate Wellness series. Previous sessions have included: Imposter Syndrome for which resources can be found here.

Thursday, 27 January 2022 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Understanding relationships is a key part of the scientific inquiry process. You will learn how to describe relationships between two numerical quantities through correlation measures and simple linear regression models. This will also be extended to multiple linear regression for including additional predictor variables. Specific topics include:

  • correlation vs causation
  • interpretation of regression model coefficients
  • assessing the “fit” of a model
  • model selection

Check out the video below for a teaser from a previous session:

Tuesday, 1 February 2022 - 3:00pm to 4:00pm

To get you started on your Three Minute Thesis journey, Simon Clews will present a look at communicating academic research to audiences outside your peers and colleagues and even beyond the walls of the academy. In this keynote presentation he will talk about:

Wednesday, 2 February 2022 - 12:30pm to 2:00pm

Negotiation is a common part of the hiring process, and many applicants find this part intimidating. This workshop will cover:

  • Benefits of negotiating your job offer
  • Things you can negotiate, and
  • Tips and strategies for job negotiation

This session also includes an interactive part to practice job negotiation with your peers.
 

Thursday, 3 February 2022 - 9:30am to 12:00pm

We live in a culture that emphasizes being perfect as a virtue in everything from body image to relationships to career achievements. The problem is that life and being human, in spite of our best efforts, is messier than this. Having high standards is one thing, but taking a perfectionistic approach to life can actually get in the way of your success.

Tuesday, 8 February 2022 - 12:00pm to 2:30pm

For academics, explaining the depth and complexity of your specialized research for those outside your discipline or for the general public can be challenging.  Being able to articulate your research for a broad audience is important for thriving as an academic as it can help in crafting competitive grant applications, presenting at conferences, being interviewed on the radio, or writing peer-reviewed publications.  It can also help in writing compelling job applications, rocking your next job interview, and excelling as a professional.  The panel will explore opportunities for honing resea

Thursday, 10 February 2022 - 1:00pm to 2:00pm

Your CV is one of the most important components of your profile as an academic and researcher. If you have questions about organization, structure, or how to use the CV to highlight your accomplishments, you may benefit from this workshop. We’ll cover typical sections, what makes the CV different from a business-style resume, and how to understand the ways in which the hiring committee will use the CV.

Friday, 11 February 2022 - 12:00pm to 2:30pm

For academics, explaining the depth and complexity of your specialized research for those outside your discipline or for the general public can be challenging.  Being able to articulate your research for a broad audience is important for thriving as an academic as it can help in crafting competitive grant applications, presenting at conferences, being interviewed on the radio, or writing peer-reviewed publications.  It can also help in writing compelling job applications, rocking your next job interviews, and excelling as a professional.  The panel will explore opportunities for honing rese

Thursday, 17 February 2022 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

Learn about generalized linear models (GLM) for categorical and count outcomes. Necessary for understanding and using these models, the following will be covered:

  • interpretation of odds, odds ratios and rate ratios
  • variable “exposure” times
  • overdispersion
  • negative binomial regression
  • considerations for Likert scale outcomes
  • handling excess zeros

Check out the video below for a teaser from a previous session:

Thursday, 10 March 2022 - 10:00am to 11:00am

Working on your thesis? This session will review the UBC formatting and submission requirements and include:

  • Planning ahead
  • Thesis formatting requirements
  • Electronic submission of theses
Facilitator (s):

Nick Rizzo, Senior Thesis/Information Clerk, Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies

 

Thursday, 17 March 2022 - 1:00pm to 3:00pm

This webinar is critical for understanding when linear regression models aren’t applicable and how to model dependent data. Topics that will be covered are:

  • consequences of ignoring dependence (increased risk of false conclusions)
  • repeated measures and other examples of dependent data
  • variance components
  • interpretation in the linear and generalized linear mixed effects context

Check out the video below for a teaser from a previous session:

Tuesday, 22 March 2022 - 11:00am to 12:30pm

Are you in the midst of writing your thesis? Are there images or portions of published manuscripts you are planning to use in your thesis?  Do you have concerns over how copyright laws could delay your thesis submission?

In this session you will learn:

Thursday, 28 April 2022 - 2:00pm to 5:00pm

Have you ever wondered how to tap into your resilience during challenging times? Imagine a situation where you face a critique of your writing from a supervisor, do not get the grant you were counting on, or have to shift your academic focus because of the realities of the job market. With scenarios such as these in mind, this interactive session will: