Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD)

Overview

The Ed.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy provides advanced preparation for education practitioners with leadership and policy responsibilities in both formal and nonformal settings. These settings include, among many others, the post-secondary sector, business and health organizations, unions, and community groups, as well as the K-12 school system.

What makes the program unique?

The program is grounded in the belief that it is important for participants to engage in scholarly discourse about understanding, critiquing, and improving practice in educational settings. It consists of six required seminars, two elective courses, a comprehensive examination, and a dissertation. While the program addresses Canadian educational issues and perspectives in a global context, it is the particular settings and leadership or policy responsibilities of the participants that are the starting points of seminars. The expertise of qualified adjunct faculty from related professional fields supplements that of the regular faculty members.

Program Structure

Students are admitted to the Ed.D. in cohorts of 10 to 15 and proceed as a group through required courses and the comprehensive examination which occurs at the end of Year 2. Students then propose and execute their dissertation research projects. Students must complete all program requirements within six years of initial enrolment. Required courses are offered on campus for two consecutive Summer Sessions (July to mid-August) and two consecutive Winter Sessions (on weekends from September to early April).

 

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Admission Information & Requirements

Program Instructions

Please ensure you follow the instructions in the online application system. After submitting your application, it is the applicant’s responsibility to ensure that all supporting materials are submitted properly and by the application deadline. The Admissions Committee will only review complete applications. You can check the status of your application and supporting materials through the online application system.

1) Check Eligibility

Minimum Academic Requirements

The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies establishes the minimum admission requirements common to all applicants, usually a minimum overall average in the B+ range (76% at UBC). The graduate program that you are applying to may have additional requirements. Please review the specific requirements for applicants with credentials from institutions in:

Each program may set higher academic minimum requirements. Please review the program website carefully to understand the program requirements. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission as it is a competitive process.

English Language Test

Applicants from a university outside Canada in which English is not the primary language of instruction must provide results of an English language proficiency examination as part of their application. Tests must have been taken within the last 24 months at the time of submission of your application.

Minimum requirements for the two most common English language proficiency tests to apply to this program are listed below:

TOEFL: Test of English as a Foreign Language - internet-based

Overall score requirement: 92

Reading

22

Writing

22

Speaking

22

Listening

22

IELTS: International English Language Testing System

Overall score requirement: 6.5

Reading

6.0

Writing

6.0

Speaking

6.0

Listening

6.0

Other Test Scores

Some programs require additional test scores such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Test (GMAT). The requirements for this program are:

The GRE is not required.

Prior degree, course and other requirements

Document Requirements

Letter of Intent; Writing Sample; Professional resume or CV

2) Meet Deadlines

Application open dates and deadlines for an upcoming intake have not yet been configured in the admissions system. Please check back later.

3) Prepare Application

Transcripts

All applicants have to submit transcripts from all past post-secondary study. Document submission requirements depend on whether your institution of study is within Canada or outside of Canada.

Letters of Reference

A minimum of three references are required for application to graduate programs at UBC. References should be requested from individuals who are prepared to provide a report on your academic ability and qualifications.

Statement of Interest

Many programs require a statement of interest, sometimes called a "statement of intent", "description of research interests" or something similar.

Supervision

Students in research-based programs usually require a faculty member to function as their supervisor. Please follow the instructions provided by each program whether applicants should contact faculty members.

Instructions regarding supervisor contact for Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD)
The program will review research interests of applicants and recommend/match faculty members during the application/evaluation process. Applicants should not reach out to faculty members directly.

Citizenship Verification

Permanent Residents of Canada must provide a clear photocopy of both sides of the Permanent Resident card.

4) Apply Online

All applicants must complete an online application form and pay the application fee to be considered for admission to UBC.

Tuition & Financial Support

Financial Support

Applicants to UBC have access to a variety of funding options, including merit-based (i.e. based on your academic performance) and need-based (i.e. based on your financial situation) opportunities.

Scholarships & awards (merit-based funding)

All applicants are encouraged to review the awards listing to identify potential opportunities to fund their graduate education. The database lists merit-based scholarships and awards and allows for filtering by various criteria, such as domestic vs. international or degree level.

Teaching Assistantships (GTA)

Graduate programs may have Teaching Assistantships available for registered full-time graduate students. Full teaching assistantships involve 12 hours work per week in preparation, lecturing, or laboratory instruction although many graduate programs offer partial TA appointments at less than 12 hours per week. Teaching assistantship rates are set by collective bargaining between the University and the Teaching Assistants' Union.

Research Assistantships (GRA)

Many professors are able to provide Research Assistantships (GRA) from their research grants to support full-time graduate students studying under their direction. The duties usually constitute part of the student's graduate degree requirements. A Graduate Research Assistantship is a form of financial support for a period of graduate study and is, therefore, not covered by a collective agreement. Unlike other forms of fellowship support for graduate students, the amount of a GRA is neither fixed nor subject to a university-wide formula. The stipend amounts vary widely, and are dependent on the field of study and the type of research grant from which the assistantship is being funded. Some research projects also require targeted research assistance and thus hire graduate students on an hourly basis.

Financial aid (need-based funding)

Canadian and US applicants may qualify for governmental loans to finance their studies. Please review eligibility and types of loans.

All students may be able to access private sector or bank loans.

Foreign government scholarships

Many foreign governments provide support to their citizens in pursuing education abroad. International applicants should check the various governmental resources in their home country, such as the Department of Education, for available scholarships.

Working while studying

The possibility to pursue work to supplement income may depend on the demands the program has on students. It should be carefully weighed if work leads to prolonged program durations or whether work placements can be meaningfully embedded into a program.

International students enrolled as full-time students with a valid study permit can work on campus for unlimited hours and work off-campus for no more than 20 hours a week.

A good starting point to explore student jobs is the UBC Work Learn program or a Co-Op placement.

Tax credits and RRSP withdrawals

Students with taxable income in Canada may be able to claim federal or provincial tax credits.

Canadian residents with RRSP accounts may be able to use the Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) which allows students to withdraw amounts from their registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) to finance full-time training or education for themselves or their partner.

Please review Filing taxes in Canada on the student services website for more information.

Cost Calculator

Applicants have access to the cost calculator to develop a financial plan that takes into account various income sources and expenses.

Enrolment, Duration & Other Stats

These statistics show data for the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy (EdD). Data are separated for each degree program combination. You may view data for other degree options in the respective program profile.

Enrolment Data

 20202019201820172016
Applications35 2920 
Offers12 1412 
New registrations11 138 
Total enrolment4946504644

Completion Rates & Times

This program has a graduation rate of 40% based on 15 students admitted between 2007 - 2009. Based on 17 graduations between 2016 - 2019 the minimum time to completion is 3.83 years and the maximum time is 8.83 years with an average of 7.00 years of study. All calculations exclude leave times.
Disclaimer
Admissions data refer to all UBC Vancouver applications, offers, new registrants for each year, May to April [data updated: 22 April 2021]. Enrolment data are based on March 1 snapshots. Program completion data are only provided for datasets comprised of more than 4 individuals. Rates and times of completion depend on a number of variables (e.g. curriculum requirements, student funding), some of which may have changed in recent years for some programs [data updated: 29 October 2020].

Doctoral Citations

A doctoral citation summarizes the nature of the independent research, provides a high-level overview of the study, states the significance of the work and says who will benefit from the findings in clear, non-specialized language, so that members of a lay audience will understand it.
Year Citation
2016 What roles should digital technologies have in universities? Dr. Gratham's research found that answers were related to place in the system. He found that policy treats technologies as means to a more efficient and competitive system. In contrast, many professors experience technologies as distracting to their aims of building relationships with students.
2015 Dr. Wilbur explored the understandings that teachers of English as an Additional Language bring to teaching students whom they believe have experienced trauma. Her project described the ways instructors create inclusive classrooms. She concluded that for programs to be responsive to the whole student there needs to be a shift in policy and practice.
2015 Dr. Robinson wrote a memoir about caring for her daughter who had an eating disorder, the impact on her family, and her encounters with health-care professionals. The findings of an online focus group with pediatric nurses, who read her memoir, pointed to the lack of knowledge of the disorder and the need for education and changes in care protocols.
2015 Dr. Suderman showed that the National Survey of Student Engagement is not currently designed to meet the diverse perspectives of international undergraduate students. Her study used extensive focus group analysis and the findings will influence international student development in higher education and research on student engagement theory.
2015 Dr. Graydon Kelsall used sequence analysis to explore the academic pathways of one Ontario college cohort. The study details diverse student transitions and suggests institutional and system barriers to student success. Her recommendations argue for individually-focused institutional support rather than approaches based on group characteristics.
2015 Dr. Bepple studied the strategies used by international post-secondary students to obtain work in Canada after graduation. In addition to academic knowledge, those students want to acquire work-based skills, relationships, cultural understanding and credentials. She concludes that the students benefit from experiential learning opportunities.
2015 Dr. Fabbi developed an innovative initiative to support Arctic Studies and Indigenous language programs at the Canadian Studies Center at the University of Washington. Considering the Arctic as a distinct world region, informed by Inuit concepts of territory and sovereignty, reconfigures the approaches used for research and practice in the area.
2014 Dr. Hunter explored sustainability policy and practice at Vancouver Island University. She interviewed administrators, faculty and students and applied the work of sociologist, Pierre Bourdieu, to help explain why some sustainability policies and practices are more successful than others, and how a campus culture of sustainability can be increased.
2014 Dr. Goedbloed examined skills policy and its relationship to apprenticeship education in Canada and B.C. between 1980 and 2010. She found that government and industry focussed on skilled labour shortages and overlooked post-secondary skill development. The study contributes to skills policy debates, particularly on unemployment and adult training.
2014 Dr. Aucoin investigated learners' views about the use of Web 2.0 applications in online and face-to-face post-secondary learning environments. The results of this study will inform instructional design and policy decisions with respect to the use of Web 2.0 applications in post-secondary education.

Pages

Further Information

Educational Leadership and Policy provides advanced preparation for education practitioners with leadership and policy responsibilities in both formal and nonformal settings. These settings include, among many others, the post-secondary sector, business and health organizations, unions, and community groups, as well as the K-12 school system.

Faculty Overview

Program Identifier

VGDEDD-G1
 
 
 
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