Master of Science in Human Nutrition (MSc)

Overview

The graduate program in Human Nutrition offers opportunities for advanced study and original investigations in basic and applied human nutrition. The curriculum includes coursework and thesis research through laboratory or field work in a variety of areas relevant to human nutrition including nutrient metabolism, diet and disease, nutrition through the life cycle and nutrition behaviours.

What makes the program unique?

The program is enriched through collaboration with colleagues in other graduate programs including Animal Science, Food Science, Pediatrics, Anatomy & Cell Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

Quick Facts

Degree
Master of Science
Subject
Health and Medicine
Mode of delivery
On campus
Specialization
Human Nutrition
Program Components
Coursework + Thesis required
Faculty
Faculty of Land and Food Systems

Program Enquiries

If you have reviewed the information on this program page and understand the requirements for this program, you may send an enquiry

Application Notes

Before you apply, please make sure you meet/exceed the admission requirements and most importantly have a supervisor confirmed.

Requirements

TOEFL (ibT) Overall Score Requirement

90
22
21
22
21

IELTS Overall Score Requirement

6.5
6.0
6.0
6.0
6.0

Supervisor commitment required prior to application?

Yes

Prior degree requirements

An undergraduate degree in a Science area.

Prerequisites / Course Requirements

Required prerequisite courses include biochemistry, human or vertebrate physiology, and advanced nutrition. A minimum of 3 credits (three hours per week, for two academic terms or one academic year) is required in each of biochemistry and physiology, and a minimum of 12 credits is required in nutrition. These prerequisite courses must be completed at the third- or fourth-year level. Students without a background in nutrition, or with less than 12 credits of undergraduate courses in nutrition, may apply to the program. However, if admitted, they will be required to take the missing credits of third- or fourth-year nutrition courses early in the graduate program, in addition to the usual M.Sc. course requirements.

Career Options

Graduates of our program have pursued academic positions at universities or colleges, consulting, or careers in health-related fields including medicine, dentistry, and others. Those who were registered dietitians before pursuing graduate study have gone on to senior clinical or administrative positions

Tuition / Program Costs

FeesCanadian Citizen / Permanent Resident / Refugee / DiplomatInternational
Application Fee$104.00$168.25
Tuition *
Installments per year33
Tuition per installment$1,665.26$2,925.58
Tuition per year
(plus annual increase, usually 2%-5%)
$4,995.78$8,776.74
Int. Tuition Award (ITA) per year (if eligible) $3,200.00 (-)
Other Fees and Costs
Student Fees (yearly)$930.14 (approx.)
Costs of living (yearly)starting at $16,884.10 (check cost calculator)
* Regular, full-time tuition. For on-leave, extension, continuing or part time (if applicable) fees see UBC Calendar.
All fees for the year are subject to adjustment and UBC reserves the right to change any fees without notice at any time, including tuition and student fees. Tuition fees are reviewed annually by the UBC Board of Governors. In recent years, tuition increases have been 2% for continuing domestic students and between 2% and 5% for continuing international students. New students may see higher increases in tuition. Admitted students who defer their admission are subject to the potentially higher tuition fees for incoming students effective at the later program start date. In case of a discrepancy between this webpage and the UBC Calendar, the UBC Calendar entry will be held to be correct.

Statistical Data

Enrolment Data

 20182017201620152014
Applications1315101634
Offers24315
New registrations24314
Total enrolment1089611

Completion Rates & Times

This program has a graduation rate of 91.3% based on 23 students admitted between 2008 - 2011. Based on 17 graduations between 2014 - 2017 the minimum time to completion is 1.66 years and the maximum time is 4.00 years with an average of 2.81 years of study. All calculations exclude leave times.
Disclaimer
Admissions data refer to all UBC Vancouver applications, offers, new registrants for each year, May to April [data updated: 22 March 2019]. Enrolment data are based on March 1 snapshots. Program completion data are only provided for datasets comprised of more than 4 individuals. Rates and times of completion depend on a number of variables (e.g. curriculum requirements, student funding), some of which may have changed in recent years for some programs [data updated: 23 September 2018].

Research Supervisors

This list shows faculty members with full supervisory privileges who are affiliated with this program. It is not a comprehensive list of all potential supervisors as faculty from other programs or faculty members without full supervisory privileges can request approvals to supervise graduate students in this program.

  • Black, Jennifer (Community Health / Public Health, nutrition, public health, food environments, social determinants of health, food banks, school food environments)
  • Conklin, Annalijn (Chronic Diseases in Elderly, Gender Epidemiology, Health Policies, Professional Practices, Obesity, Social Determinants of Dietary and Metabolic Disorders, Community Health / Public Health, healthy ageing, obesity prevention, diabetes management and evaluation, healthcare quality improvement, implementation science, gender and health equity, nutrition-related policy and outcomes)
  • Devlin, Angela (obesity, children, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, developmental programming)
  • Elango, Rajavel (Protein Nutrition, Maternal-Fetal Nutrition, Childhood Malnutrition, Amino Acid Metabolism, Human Nutrition )
  • Jessri, Mahsa (Nutrition, Community Health / Public Health, Epidemiology, Health Policies, Lifestyle Determinants and Health, Health Promotion, Health Prevention, Statistics and Probabilities, Preventive medicine, Nutritional Epidemiology, Public and Population Health, Dietetics, Clinical Epidemiology, Preventive Medicine, Chronic Disease Prevention, Dietary Pattern Modeling, Predictive Analytics, Dietary Assessment)
  • Karakochuk, Crystal Dawn (Nutrition, Global Health and Emerging Diseases, Hematology, Maternal and child nutrition, Micronutrients (namely iron, folic acid, and zinc), Biochemical markers of iron status, Determinants and causes of anemia, Inherited blood disorders (sickle cell, thalassemia, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency), International nutrition, Clinical dietetics, Risk-benefit of micronutrient supplementation)
  • Lamers, Yvonne (Nutrition, Nutrients, Biological and Biochemical Mechanisms, Breast Feeding and Infant Nutrition, Nutritional Biochemistry, Micronutrients, Vitamins, Nutritional Biomarker, Pregnancy, Periconceptional folic acid supplementation, Prenatal Supplements, Newborn Screening, Toddler Nutrition, Clinical Chemistry, Maternal and Child Health, Newborn Screening)
  • Murphy, Rachel (Nutrition, Nutrition and Cancer, Community Health / Public Health, Obesity, Nutrition, Cancer prevention, Obesity, Aging)
  • Stefanska, Barbara (Nutrition and Cancer, Breast Cancer, Hepatic Diseases, Gene Regulation and Expression, Epigenetics, Cancer epigenetics, Nutritional epigenomics)
  • Xu, Zhaoming (Nutrients, Zinc, growth, and growth regulation, Regulatory role of zinc in apoptosis, Zinc and breast cancer)
 
 
 

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