Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)

Overview

The M.S.N. program prepares graduates to be leaders. Program completion opens new horizons for nurses in education, advanced practice, policy implementation, health care management, and nursing knowledge development. Applicants must be registered nurses with a bachelor's degree, normally in nursing, who meet the admission requirements of the UBC Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies. Program graduates develop skills in leadership in professional nursing practice. The program offers opportunities to move directly into doctoral studies.

What makes the program unique?

The School of Nursing has been a leader in knowledge development and scholarship in nursing for almost 100 years. Our master's program alumni are making an impact at local, national, and international levels.

Although we have one of the largest graduate nursing programs in Canada (over 150 MSN students), we offer graduate students an experience as part of a community of scholars characterized by diversity, mutual respect, and integration. Students are making significant contributions to knowledge development through their research projects.

Our MSN program has long been reviewed and assessed by the British Columbia College of Nurses and Midwives and many licensing boards across North America and accredited by the  Canadian Association of Schools of Nursing.

Program Structure

Students complete a total of 30 credits, comprising core, focus, and elective courses and a 3-credit research project (NURS 595) or a 9-credit thesis (NURS 599).

 

Program Enquiries

Still have questions after reviewing this page thoroughly?
Contact the program

Admission Information & Requirements

1) Check Eligibility

Minimum Academic Requirements

The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies establishes the minimum admission requirements common to all applicants, usually a minimum overall average in the B+ range (76% at UBC). The graduate program that you are applying to may have additional requirements. Please review the specific requirements for applicants with credentials from institutions in:

Each program may set higher academic minimum requirements. Please review the program website carefully to understand the program requirements. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission as it is a competitive process.

English Language Test

Applicants from a university outside Canada in which English is not the primary language of instruction must provide results of an English language proficiency examination as part of their application. Tests must have been taken within the last 24 months at the time of submission of your application.

Minimum requirements for the two most common English language proficiency tests to apply to this program are listed below:

TOEFL: Test of English as a Foreign Language - internet-based

Overall score requirement: 100

Reading

22

Writing

21

Speaking

21

Listening

22

IELTS: International English Language Testing System

Overall score requirement: 7.0

Reading

6.5

Writing

7.0

Speaking

7.0

Listening

7.5

Other Test Scores

Some programs require additional test scores such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Test (GMAT). The requirements for this program are:

The GRE is required by some applicants. Please check the program website.

2) Meet Deadlines

Application open dates and deadlines for an upcoming intake have not yet been configured in the admissions system. Please check back later.

3) Prepare Application

Transcripts

All applicants have to submit transcripts from all past post-secondary study. Document submission requirements depend on whether your institution of study is within Canada or outside of Canada.

Letters of Reference

A minimum of three references are required for application to graduate programs at UBC. References should be requested from individuals who are prepared to provide a report on your academic ability and qualifications.

Statement of Interest

Many programs require a statement of interest, sometimes called a "statement of intent", "description of research interests" or something similar.

Supervision

Students in research-based programs usually require a faculty member to function as their supervisor. Please follow the instructions provided by each program whether applicants should contact faculty members.

Instructions regarding supervisor contact for Master of Science in Nursing (MSN)
Applicants should browse faculty profiles and indicate in their application who they are interested in working with. However, it is not necessary for applicants to contact faculty members prior to their application.

Citizenship Verification

Permanent Residents of Canada must provide a clear photocopy of both sides of the Permanent Resident card.

4) Apply Online

All applicants must complete an online application form and pay the application fee to be considered for admission to UBC.

Tuition & Financial Support

Tuition

FeesCanadian Citizen / Permanent Resident / Refugee / DiplomatInternational
Application Fee$108.00$168.25
Tuition *
Installments per year33
Tuition per installment$1,732.53$3,043.77
Tuition per year
(plus annual increase, usually 2%-5%)
$5,197.59$9,131.31
Int. Tuition Award (ITA) per year (if eligible) $3,200.00 (-)
Other Fees and Costs
Student Fees (yearly)$969.17 (approx.)
Costs of living (yearly)starting at $17,242.00 (check cost calculator)
* Regular, full-time tuition. For on-leave, extension, continuing or part time (if applicable) fees see UBC Calendar.
All fees for the year are subject to adjustment and UBC reserves the right to change any fees without notice at any time, including tuition and student fees. Tuition fees are reviewed annually by the UBC Board of Governors. In recent years, tuition increases have been 2% for continuing domestic students and between 2% and 5% for continuing international students. New students may see higher increases in tuition. Admitted students who defer their admission are subject to the potentially higher tuition fees for incoming students effective at the later program start date. In case of a discrepancy between this webpage and the UBC Calendar, the UBC Calendar entry will be held to be correct.

Financial Support

Applicants to UBC have access to a variety of funding options, including merit-based (i.e. based on your academic performance) and need-based (i.e. based on your financial situation) opportunities.

Scholarships & awards (merit-based funding)

All applicants are encouraged to review the awards listing to identify potential opportunities to fund their graduate education. The database lists merit-based scholarships and awards and allows for filtering by various criteria, such as domestic vs. international or degree level.

Teaching Assistantships (GTA)

Graduate programs may have Teaching Assistantships available for registered full-time graduate students. Full teaching assistantships involve 12 hours work per week in preparation, lecturing, or laboratory instruction although many graduate programs offer partial TA appointments at less than 12 hours per week. Teaching assistantship rates are set by collective bargaining between the University and the Teaching Assistants' Union.

Research Assistantships (GRA)

Many professors are able to provide Research Assistantships (GRA) from their research grants to support full-time graduate students studying under their direction. The duties usually constitute part of the student's graduate degree requirements. A Graduate Research Assistantship is a form of financial support for a period of graduate study and is, therefore, not covered by a collective agreement. Unlike other forms of fellowship support for graduate students, the amount of a GRA is neither fixed nor subject to a university-wide formula. The stipend amounts vary widely, and are dependent on the field of study and the type of research grant from which the assistantship is being funded. Some research projects also require targeted research assistance and thus hire graduate students on an hourly basis.

Financial aid (need-based funding)

Canadian and US applicants may qualify for governmental loans to finance their studies. Please review eligibility and types of loans.

All students may be able to access private sector or bank loans.

Foreign government scholarships

Many foreign governments provide support to their citizens in pursuing education abroad. International applicants should check the various governmental resources in their home country, such as the Department of Education, for available scholarships.

Working while studying

The possibility to pursue work to supplement income may depend on the demands the program has on students. It should be carefully weighed if work leads to prolonged program durations or whether work placements can be meaningfully embedded into a program.

International students enrolled as full-time students with a valid study permit can work on campus for unlimited hours and work off-campus for no more than 20 hours a week.

A good starting point to explore student jobs is the UBC Work Learn program or a Co-Op placement.

Tax credits and RRSP withdrawals

Students with taxable income in Canada may be able to claim federal or provincial tax credits.

Canadian residents with RRSP accounts may be able to use the Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) which allows students to withdraw amounts from their registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) to finance full-time training or education for themselves or their partner.

Please review Filing taxes in Canada on the student services website for more information.

Cost Calculator

Applicants have access to the cost calculator to develop a financial plan that takes into account various income sources and expenses.

Career Options

The MSN program (24 months) prepares students for employment in the public or private sector, or to pursue further studies in a Ph.D. program. Graduates occupy leadership positions within numerous health authorities in Canada and the international community, as well as teaching positions in colleges and universities.

Program graduates create new initiatives in delivery of care, the advancement and application of knowledge, and the evolution of health policy. UBC MSN-prepared nurses have made major contributions in countries around the world, including Haiti, India, and South Africa. 

Enrolment, Duration & Other Stats

These statistics show data for the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN). Data are separated for each degree program combination. You may view data for other degree options in the respective program profile.

Enrolment Data

 20202019201820172016
Applications4649604047
Offers3437452629
New registrations2634291721
Total enrolment100101101107120

Completion Rates & Times

This program has a graduation rate of 86.61% based on 112 students admitted between 2010 - 2013. Based on 107 graduations between 2016 - 2019 the minimum time to completion is 1.33 years and the maximum time is 6.00 years with an average of 3.59 years of study. All calculations exclude leave times.
Disclaimer
Admissions data refer to all UBC Vancouver applications, offers, new registrants for each year, May to April [data updated: 22 April 2021]. Enrolment data are based on March 1 snapshots. Program completion data are only provided for datasets comprised of more than 4 individuals. Rates and times of completion depend on a number of variables (e.g. curriculum requirements, student funding), some of which may have changed in recent years for some programs [data updated: 29 October 2020].

Research Supervisors

This list shows faculty members with full supervisory privileges who are affiliated with this program. It is not a comprehensive list of all potential supervisors as faculty from other programs or faculty members without full supervisory privileges can request approvals to supervise graduate students in this program.

  • Baumbusch, Jennifer (long-term residential care, family caregiving, Intellectual Disability, nursing care of older adults )
  • Boschma, Geertje (History of nursing and health care, with special emphasis on mental health and mental health nursing)
  • Brown, Helen Jean (Maternal-infant and women)
  • Browne, Annette (Health inequalities, indigenous peoples, women's health, cultural safety, primary health care interventions to improve health outcomes, marginalized populations, health policy)
  • Bungay, Victoria (sexuality, sex work, harm reduction, drug use, intersectionality, ethnography, communication technologies, community based research, Health inequities affecting men and women working in the commercial sex industry and people who are street-involved, leadership, public health nursing, mental health, sexual health, HIV, and harm reduction programming)
  • Campbell, Suzanne (Nursing; Community Health / Public Health; Health Promotion; Interpersonal Communication; Educational Technologies; Health Care Technologies; Modelization and Simulation; social determinants of health; Global Health and Emerging Diseases; Adult Education and Continuing Education; global maternal-infant-child health; health communication; interprofessional health professional education; lactation support; leadership in nursing; simulation nursing education)
  • Currie, Leanne (Nursing; Health Care Technologies; Health information systems; Artificial Intelligence; Biomedical Technologies; decision making; Computer Architecture; Software Development; Artificial Intelligence in Healthcare; Biomedical and Health Informatics; data science; Human Computer Interaction and Design)
  • Dahinten, Susan (Social determinants and processes of child development, identification, intervention and the prevention of developmental problems)
  • Garrett, Bernard Mark (Nursing; Health Care Technologies; Ethics and Health; Media Influence on Behavior; Alternative Medicine; Augmented reality; Deception in Healthcare; Evidence-basedPpractice; Healthcare Regulation; Virtual Reality (VR))
  • Haase, Kristen (Nursing, n.e.c.; oncology; Older Adults; Geriatric oncology; Health systems research; Mixed Methods Research; Qualitative research; Self-management; E-health)
  • Havaei, Farinaz (Nursing; factors that influence nurses’ ability to provide effective patient care; health human resource optimization)
  • Hirani, Saima (Sociology and related studies; Health sciences; Nursing; mental health; Mental health promotion; psychosocial interventions; Vulnerable Groups; social support; resilience)
  • Howard, Fuchsia (health service needs of vulnerable, high-risk survivors of acute life-threatening illness, specifically, cancer survivors and survivors of critical illnesses; hereditary cancer prevention and risk management and psychosocial and ethnocultural factors that shape health and illness experiences)
  • Hung, Lillian (Geriatric nursing; Medical and biomedical engineering; Impact of technology and environment on the care experiences of persons with dementia; dementia education; quality improvement; Participatory action research)
  • Jenkins, Emily (optimizing mental health and substance use outcomes; collaborative mental health promotion strategies; health services and policy development and redesign; knowledge translation approaches; healthy public policy development)
  • MacPhee, Maura (professional development, higher education, patient safety, systems analysis, leadership and management, pediatrics )
  • Moss, Margaret (American Indian health; Aging; Health Policy; health disparities with a focus on social and structural determinants of health)
  • Ojukwu, Emmanuela (Health sciences; Social sciences; Humanities and the arts; Racial and gender health disparities and inequities; African, Carribbean and Black Immigrant Health; Women, Maternal-Infant, Youth Health; Psycho-social and Socio-ecologic determinants of health; Mental health, HIV/AIDS and other STIs; intersectionality)
  • Oliffe, John (Care; Sociology and related studies; Men's Health Promotion; Male Depression and Suicide; Psychosocial Prostate Cancer Care; Smoking Cessation)
  • Phinney, Alison (Capacities of older people for successfully coping with the functional consequences of aging and disease)
  • Ranger, Manon (Neurodevelopment; Clinical nursing, secondary (acute care); neurodevelopment; Early-adversity; Biomarkers of early stress exposure; Brain development; pain; Prematurity)
  • Saewyc, Elizabeth (Homeless or street involved youth, sexual minority youth, sexual exploitation of youth, discrimination, trauma and resilience., Youth health issues, stigma, violence, trauma, adolescent health, protective factors, sexual minority, homeless, immigrant, indigenous)
  • Thorne, Sally (Clinical oncology; Nursing; cancer care; chronic illness)
  • Varcoe, Colleen (How the inequities of ethnicity, class, place and ability are central to violence against women, enhancing practice and policy in the context of violence and inequity)
  • Wong, Sabrina (Primary Health Care, Primary Care, vulnerable populations, marginalized groups, ethno-cultural, patient experiences, quality of care, Organization and delivery of health care, informing practice and system level interventions that seek to decrease health inequalities among Canadian residents, including people who face multiple disadvantages in accessing and using the health care system such as those who have language barriers and live in poverty)

Pages

Further Information

Specialization

The program focuses on improving health care delivery, advancing and applying nursing knowledge, and evolving health policy.

Faculty Overview

Academic Unit

Program Identifier

VGMMSN

Classification

 
 
 
Supervisor Search
 

Departments/Programs may update graduate degree program details through the Faculty & Staff portal. To update the application inquiries contact details please use this form.

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