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Overview

The Graduate Program in Hispanic Studies offers a dynamic curriculum focusing on a contextualized knowledge of the languages, literatures, and cultures of Latin America, Spain, and other Spanish-speaking communities within the US and Canada.

What makes the program unique?

Cutting-Edge Research:
The doctoral program in Hispanic Studies provides a wide variety of graduate courses taught by a growing team of faculty members specializing in innovative research, from Medieval Spanish literature to 21st-century Latin American and Caribbean cultures. The program offers solid academic training through our research clusters, reading groups, and research seminar. Students may participate in or even lead these initiatives, both within the department and in interdisciplinary centres, such as Green College, the Public Humanities Hub, and the Liu Institute for Global Issues.

Professional Development:
We provide a comprehensive Teaching Assistant training program as well as academic and professional development workshops—on grant writing, publishing, and conference attendance, among other topics—to help graduate students diversify their skillset and make an impact on society. 70% of graduates from our PhD program successfully landed careers in academia according to a career outcome survey.

Community Involvement:
Our annual Graduate Student Symposium allows graduate students to present their research to the entire Department. The biennial FHIS Graduate Student Conference, organized by the graduate students themselves with the assistance of faculty members, offers a platform to share research results with the wider academic community, network with local and international peers, and plan large-scale academic events. Through the FHIS Learning Centre, graduate students may also volunteer as tutors to help undergraduate students become proficient in the languages that are taught in our Department. In addition, the FHIS Cultural Club encourages students to discuss noteworthy social and cultural phenomena with our tight-knit community, engaging with current debates in our disciplines.

 
 

Program Enquiries

Still have questions after reviewing this page thoroughly?
Contact the program

Admission Information & Requirements

1) Check Eligibility

Minimum Academic Requirements

The Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies establishes the minimum admission requirements common to all applicants, usually a minimum overall average in the B+ range (76% at UBC). The graduate program that you are applying to may have additional requirements. Please review the specific requirements for applicants with credentials from institutions in:

Each program may set higher academic minimum requirements. Please review the program website carefully to understand the program requirements. Meeting the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission as it is a competitive process.

English Language Test

Applicants from a university outside Canada in which English is not the primary language of instruction must provide results of an English language proficiency examination as part of their application. Tests must have been taken within the last 24 months at the time of submission of your application.

Minimum requirements for the two most common English language proficiency tests to apply to this program are listed below:

TOEFL: Test of English as a Foreign Language - internet-based

Overall score requirement: 90

Reading

22

Writing

21

Speaking

21

Listening

22

IELTS: International English Language Testing System

Overall score requirement: 6.5

Reading

6.0

Writing

6.0

Speaking

6.0

Listening

6.0

Other Test Scores

Some programs require additional test scores such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or the Graduate Management Test (GMAT). The requirements for this program are:

The GRE is not required.

2) Meet Deadlines

Application open dates and deadlines for an upcoming intake have not yet been configured in the admissions system. Please check back later.

3) Prepare Application

Transcripts

All applicants have to submit transcripts from all past post-secondary study. Document submission requirements depend on whether your institution of study is within Canada or outside of Canada.

Letters of Reference

A minimum of three references are required for application to graduate programs at UBC. References should be requested from individuals who are prepared to provide a report on your academic ability and qualifications.

Statement of Interest

Many programs require a statement of interest, sometimes called a "statement of intent", "description of research interests" or something similar.

Supervision

Students in research-based programs usually require a faculty member to function as their thesis supervisor. Please follow the instructions provided by each program whether applicants should contact faculty members.

Instructions regarding thesis supervisor contact for Doctor of Philosophy in Hispanic Studies (PhD)
Applicants should browse faculty profiles and indicate in their application who they are interested in working with. However, it is not necessary for applicants to contact faculty members prior to their application.

Citizenship Verification

Permanent Residents of Canada must provide a clear photocopy of both sides of the Permanent Resident card.

4) Apply Online

All applicants must complete an online application form and pay the application fee to be considered for admission to UBC.

Research Information

Research Highlights

We invite you to learn more about our research by visiting our departmental research spotlight webpage.

Tuition & Financial Support

Tuition

FeesCanadian Citizen / Permanent Resident / Refugee / DiplomatInternational
Application Fee$114.00$168.25
Tuition *
Installments per year33
Tuition per installment$1,838.57$3,230.06
Tuition per year
(plus annual increase, usually 2%-5%)
$5,515.71$9,690.18
Int. Tuition Award (ITA) per year (if eligible) $3,200.00 (-)
Other Fees and Costs
Student Fees (yearly)$1,116.60 (approx.)
Costs of livingEstimate your costs of living with our interactive tool in order to start developing a financial plan for your graduate studies.
* Regular, full-time tuition. For on-leave, extension, continuing or part time (if applicable) fees see UBC Calendar.
All fees for the year are subject to adjustment and UBC reserves the right to change any fees without notice at any time, including tuition and student fees. Tuition fees are reviewed annually by the UBC Board of Governors. In recent years, tuition increases have been 2% for continuing domestic students and between 2% and 5% for continuing international students. New students may see higher increases in tuition. Admitted students who defer their admission are subject to the potentially higher tuition fees for incoming students effective at the later program start date. In case of a discrepancy between this webpage and the UBC Calendar, the UBC Calendar entry will be held to be correct.

Financial Support

Applicants to UBC have access to a variety of funding options, including merit-based (i.e. based on your academic performance) and need-based (i.e. based on your financial situation) opportunities.

Program Funding Packages

All doctoral students are guaranteed a minimum funding package of $24,000 per year for the first five years of full-time study through a combination of Teaching Assistantships, Research Assistantships, awards, and scholarships. We offer a variety of additional financial aid options, including a Graduate Research Grant to conduct doctoral research and a Graduate Student Travel Grant to attend conferences abroad.

Average Funding
Based on the criteria outlined below, 8 students within this program were included in this study because they received funding through UBC in the form of teaching, research, academic assistantships or internal or external awards averaging $34,866.
  • 7 students received Teaching Assistantships. Average TA funding based on 7 students was $10,840.
  • 4 students received Research Assistantships. Average RA funding based on 4 students was $4,717.
  • 5 students received Academic Assistantships. Average AA funding based on 5 students was $2,450.
  • 8 students received internal awards. Average internal award funding based on 8 students was $18,587.
  • 1 student received external awards valued at $6,667.

Study Period: Sep 2022 to Aug 2023 - average funding for full-time PhD students enrolled in three terms per academic year in this program across years 1-4, the period covered by UBC's Minimum Funding Guarantee. Averages might mask variability in sources and amounts of funding received by individual students. Beyond year 4, funding packages become even more individualized.
Review methodology
Scholarships & awards (merit-based funding)

All applicants are encouraged to review the awards listing to identify potential opportunities to fund their graduate education. The database lists merit-based scholarships and awards and allows for filtering by various criteria, such as domestic vs. international or degree level.

Graduate Research Assistantships (GRA)

Many professors are able to provide Research Assistantships (GRA) from their research grants to support full-time graduate students studying under their supervision. The duties constitute part of the student's graduate degree requirements. A Graduate Research Assistantship is considered a form of fellowship for a period of graduate study and is therefore not covered by a collective agreement. Stipends vary widely, and are dependent on the field of study and the type of research grant from which the assistantship is being funded.

Graduate Teaching Assistantships (GTA)

Graduate programs may have Teaching Assistantships available for registered full-time graduate students. Full teaching assistantships involve 12 hours work per week in preparation, lecturing, or laboratory instruction although many graduate programs offer partial TA appointments at less than 12 hours per week. Teaching assistantship rates are set by collective bargaining between the University and the Teaching Assistants' Union.

Graduate Academic Assistantships (GAA)

Academic Assistantships are employment opportunities to perform work that is relevant to the university or to an individual faculty member, but not to support the student’s graduate research and thesis. Wages are considered regular earnings and when paid monthly, include vacation pay.

Financial aid (need-based funding)

Canadian and US applicants may qualify for governmental loans to finance their studies. Please review eligibility and types of loans.

All students may be able to access private sector or bank loans.

Foreign government scholarships

Many foreign governments provide support to their citizens in pursuing education abroad. International applicants should check the various governmental resources in their home country, such as the Department of Education, for available scholarships.

Working while studying

The possibility to pursue work to supplement income may depend on the demands the program has on students. It should be carefully weighed if work leads to prolonged program durations or whether work placements can be meaningfully embedded into a program.

International students enrolled as full-time students with a valid study permit can work on campus for unlimited hours and work off-campus for no more than 20 hours a week.

A good starting point to explore student jobs is the UBC Work Learn program or a Co-Op placement.

Tax credits and RRSP withdrawals

Students with taxable income in Canada may be able to claim federal or provincial tax credits.

Canadian residents with RRSP accounts may be able to use the Lifelong Learning Plan (LLP) which allows students to withdraw amounts from their registered retirement savings plan (RRSPs) to finance full-time training or education for themselves or their partner.

Please review Filing taxes in Canada on the student services website for more information.

Cost Estimator

Applicants have access to the cost estimator to develop a financial plan that takes into account various income sources and expenses.

Career Outcomes

9 students graduated between 2005 and 2013: 1 graduate is seeking employment; for 1 we have no data (based on research conducted between Feb-May 2016). For the remaining 7 graduates:


RI (Research-Intensive) Faculty: typically tenure-track faculty positions (equivalent of the North American Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor positions) in PhD-granting institutions
TI (Teaching-Intensive) Faculty: typically full-time faculty positions in colleges or in institutions not granting PhDs, and teaching faculty at PhD-granting institutions
Term Faculty: faculty in term appointments (e.g. sessional lecturers, visiting assistant professors, etc.)
Sample Employers in Higher Education
Mount Royal University
University of Lethbridge
University of Prince Edward Island
University of British Columbia
University of Aberdeen
Sample Employers Outside Higher Education
Davey Tree Expert Co.
Sample Job Titles Outside Higher Education
Area Manager
Interpreter, translator
PhD Career Outcome Survey
You may view the full report on career outcomes of UBC PhD graduates on outcomes.grad.ubc.ca.
Disclaimer
These data represent historical employment information and do not guarantee future employment prospects for graduates of this program. They are for informational purposes only. Data were collected through either alumni surveys or internet research.
Career Options

The PhD prepares students for a teaching and research career at the university level. Recent PhD graduates from the department have obtained positions at various universities, such as, the University of Lethbridge, Mount Royal College, Lakehead University, Carleton University, Mount Alison University, University of South Carolina, Rhode Island College, University of Aberdeen, and the University of Otago. Former students have also obtained positions in the public sector, such as the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Enrolment, Duration & Other Stats

These statistics show data for the Doctor of Philosophy in Hispanic Studies (PhD). Data are separated for each degree program combination. You may view data for other degree options in the respective program profile.

ENROLMENT DATA

 20232022202120202019
Applications51411106
Offers13342
New Registrations12132
Total Enrolment1416151318

Completion Rates & Times

This program has a graduation rate of 67% based on 9 students admitted between 2011 - 2014. Based on 8 graduations between 2020 - 2023 the minimum time to completion is 3.41 years and the maximum time is 8.42 years with an average of 5.26 years of study. All calculations exclude leave times.
Disclaimer
Admissions data refer to all UBC Vancouver applications, offers, new registrants for each registration year, May to April, e.g. data for 2022 refers to programs starting in 2022 Summer and 2022 Winter session, i.e. May 1, 2022 to April 30, 2023. Data on total enrolment reflects enrolment in Winter Session Term 1 and are based on snapshots taken on November 1 of each registration year. Program completion data are only provided for datasets comprised of more than 4 individuals. Graduation rates exclude students who transfer out of their programs. Rates and times of completion depend on a number of variables (e.g. curriculum requirements, student funding), some of which may have changed in recent years for some programs.

Research Supervisors

Supervision

Students in research-based programs usually require a faculty member to function as their thesis supervisor. Please follow the instructions provided by each program whether applicants should contact faculty members.

Instructions regarding thesis supervisor contact for Doctor of Philosophy in Hispanic Studies (PhD)
Applicants should browse faculty profiles and indicate in their application who they are interested in working with. However, it is not necessary for applicants to contact faculty members prior to their application.
 
 

This list shows faculty members with full supervisory privileges who are affiliated with this program. It is not a comprehensive list of all potential supervisors as faculty from other programs or faculty members without full supervisory privileges can request approvals to supervise graduate students in this program.

  • Alvarez Moreno, Raul (Literary or Artistic Works Analysis; Artistic and Literary Movements, Schools and Styles; Artistic and Literary Theories; Literary or Artistic Work Dissemination or Reception Contexts; Language, Knowledge, Significance and Thought Building; Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literature and Culture (Celestina, picaresque novel, short story); Economy and Medieval Literature and Culture; Visual Culture in Medieval and Early Modern Spain; Relations between Language and Ideology; travel writing)
  • Beasley-Murray, Jon (Latin American studies, social and political theory)
  • Beauchesne, Kim (Colonialism; Latin America; Trans-Pacific Studies; Globalization)
  • Casas Aguilar, Anna (Contemporary literatures; Spanish Cultural Studies; Catalan Literature and Culture; Gender Studies; Masculinities; Feminisms; Self-writing; Hispanic Cinemas)
  • Fernandez Utrera, Maria Soledad (Peninsular contemporary literature and culture)
  • Lagresa-González, Elizabeth (Humanities and the arts; Early modern Literature and Culture; Early modern Theater; Early modern Visual and Material culture; Queer, Gender and Sexuality studies; Cross-cultural and Comparative studies)
  • Mitchell, Tamara (Literary or Artistic Work Analysis; Artistic and Literary Theories; Political Ideologies; Contemporary Mexican Literature and Culture; Neoliberalism, Globalization, (Post-)National Politics; Political Philosophy, Critical Theory; Border and Diaspora Studies; Contemporary Central American Literature and Culture; Digital Humanities; Sound Studies)
  • Santos, Alessandra (Cinema studies; Film, television and digital media; Latin American history; Latin American literatures; Spanish language; Artistic and Literary Analysis Models; Artistic and Literary Theories; Arts and Cultural Traditions; Arts and Technologies; Brazilian Literature and Culture; Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies; Latin American Literatures and Cultures; Modern and Contemporary Literatures and Cultures)
  • Victoriano, Ramon Antonio (Caribbean literatures; Latin American literatures; Contemporary literatures; Hispanic Caribbean Literatures and Cultures; Latin American Contemporary Novel and Short Story; Caribbean Literatures)
  • Zhang, Gaoheng (Intercultural and Ethnic Relationships; Cultural Exchanges; Migrations, Populations, Cultural Exchanges; Media and Society; Media Ethics; Media and Democratization; Migration Studies; Mobility Studies; Postcolonial Studies; Gender and Masculinity Studies; Race Theory; Film and Media Studies; Rhetoric and Communication Studies; Cultural Theory; Italian-Chinese relations; Italy's global networks; Modern and contemporary Italian literature and culture)

Doctoral Citations

A doctoral citation summarizes the nature of the independent research, provides a high-level overview of the study, states the significance of the work and says who will benefit from the findings in clear, non-specialized language, so that members of a lay audience will understand it.
Year Citation
2023 Dr. García Martínez developed the conceptual distinction between accumulation and cumulation. The former is a system of value built on the latter. He proposed that for our contemporary crisis, writing depicts a cumulation, a profuse pile-up, ever more resistant to the imposition of some kind of system of value.
2023 Dr. Castaneda studied narratives and aesthetics in 21st century Colombian films that challenged the longstanding invisibility of Afro-Colombian subjects. Her analysis helps in increasing awareness of anti-racist trends and the struggle to democratize the film representation regime in which the White/Mestizo aesthetics remains dominant.
2022 Dr. Moscoso-Garay studied the literature of the Rubber Extraction Time in the Amazonia (1879-1914). He examined how the industrial modernization helped to perpetuate stereotypes of gender and nature in the Amazon. His research challenges assumptions about discourses of modernity in the Amazonia
2022 Dr. Ortiz examines the role of the magazines in the early twentieth-century intellectual and cultural fields of the Andes. He analyzes how magazines become a dispositif that operates in-between the aesthetic and political ideologies discussed and disputed in the interplay of avant-garde movements, political revolutions, and social transformations.
2020 Dr. Oluic dissertation focuses on the creation of an imagined European community in the nineteenth century as posited by four thinkers and essayists from Spain and Italy. His research elaborates a link between nineteenth century Europeanism and the present, exploring the relations that define national and supranational sovereignty.
2020 Dr. Villacreses proposes a conceptual approach to understand literary production from a writer's global creative project. He incorporates media studies, the analysis of works of fiction, critical interventions, and public image into the overall literary study of an author. He applied this method in Latin American writers from the late 20th century.
2020 Dr. O'Regan explored the notion of community in literature of the Hispanic Caribbean diasporas, focusing on authors who write communities that escape classification. No longer identifying by race, culture, class, gender, or sexuality, these collectivities privilege difference over identity for a creative relationality.
2020 Dr. Miranda Barrios documented Latin American exiles' use of radio to recreate cultural and political identities and forge solidarity in a west coast Canadian context. Her work sheds light on the efforts of diasporic groups to use bilingual community media to engage diasporic and non-diasporic audiences in social, cultural, and political issues.
2020 Dr. Monje proposes a new approach to Colombian literature that focuses on the sociable nature of Literary Cafés, which unites a diversity of texts and analyzes them in a way that unveils writers' associations over time. This research shows an innovative way of reading literature, which can be applied in different spatio-temporal contexts.
2019 Dr. Tocco examined the role of the individual and the state in Latin American detective stories. His research contrasts these narratives with classic detective stories written in North America and the United Kingdom, offering new ways of reading them. Researchers and the general public interested in detective stories will benefit from his findings.

Pages

Further Information

Specialization

Hispanic Studies offers opportunities for advanced study in the literatures of Spain and Spanish America with courses ranging from topics in Spanish and Latin American literature and culture to the possibility of studying literary and cultural theory or issues in second-language instruction.

Faculty Overview

Program Identifier

VGDPHD-L1
 
 
 
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