Doctor of Philosophy in Classics (PhD)

Quick Facts

Degree
Doctor of Philosophy
Subject
Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities
Mode of delivery
On campus
Registration options
Full-time
Specialization
Classics
Program Components
Dissertation
Faculty
Faculty of Arts
 

Overview

Our program is designed to develop candidates' skills to the highest level by developing competence in Greek and Latin and the relevant modern languages and by exposing candidates to a very wide range of academic approaches to the ancient world, thus taking advantage of the unique combination of disciplines in this department. Students' progress is monitored constantly stage by stage to ensure that no aspect of their development is neglected. Up until the Comprehensive Examination the emphasis is on range and breadth; after that, students will be encouraged and enabled to narrow their focus so that they become world experts in their chosen dissertation topic.

 

Research Information

Research Focus

Classical Literature and Language, Ancient History, Classical Archaeology

Requirements

TOEFL (ibT) Overall Score Requirement

100
22
21
22
21

IELTS Overall Score Requirement

7.0
6.5
6.5
6.5
6.5

Funding Sources

We aim to support all of our graduate students, with the vast majority receiving funding. Well qualified PhD applicants (with a completed MA) receive approximately $25,000 per year over four years (including scholarships, teaching assistantships and research assistantships; contingent upon academic performance), with exceptional students receiving over $40,000 per year.  Typical support for MA students is around $14,000 per year for two years (contingent upon academic performance).

Career Outcomes

9 students graduated between 2005 and 2013. Of these, career information was obtained for 7 alumni (based on research conducted between Feb-May 2016):


RI (Research-Intensive) Faculty: typically tenure-track faculty positions (equivalent of the North American Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Professor positions) in PhD-granting institutions
TI (Teaching-Intensive) Faculty: typically full-time faculty positions in colleges or in institutions not granting PhDs, and teaching faculty at PhD-granting institutions
Term Faculty: faculty in term appointments (e.g. sessional lecturers, visiting assistant professors, etc.)
Sample Employers in Higher Education
Grant MacEwan University (2)
The University of Winnipeg
University of British Columbia
Hobart and William Smith Colleges
Dalhousie University
Sample Employers Outside Higher Education
Wetaskiwin & District Heritage Museum
Sample Job Titles Outside Higher Education
Executive Director & Chief Curator
PhD Career Outcome Survey
You may view the full report on career outcomes of UBC PhD graduates on outcomes.grad.ubc.ca.
Disclaimer
These data represent historical employment information and do not guarantee future employment prospects for graduates of this program. They are for informational purposes only. Data were collected through either alumni surveys or internet research.
Career Options

Our aim is to equip our graduating PhD students with all the professional skills they may need to attain a tenure-track teaching position and to carry out the varied responsibilities which such a position brings.

Tuition / Program Costs

FeesCanadian Citizen / Permanent Resident / Refugee / DiplomatInternational
Application Fee$102.00$165.00
Tuition *
Installments per year33
Tuition per installment$1,600.60$2,811.98
Tuition per year$4,801.80$8,435.94
Int. Tuition Award (ITA) per year (if eligible) $3,200.00 (-)
Other Fees and Costs
Student Fees (yearly)$923.38 (approx.)
Costs of living (yearly)starting at $16,884.10 (check cost calculator)
* Regular, full-time tuition. For on-leave, extension, continuing or part time (if applicable) fees see UBC Calendar.
All fees for the year are subject to adjustment and UBC reserves the right to change any fees without notice at any time, including tuition and student fees. In case of a discrepancy between this webpage and the UBC Calendar, the UBC Calendar entry will be held to be correct.

Statistical Data

Enrolment Data

 20162015201420132012
Applications1381398
Offers21453
New registrations2121 
Total enrolment86988

Completion Rates & Times

Based on 6 graduations between 2012 - 2015 the minimum time to completion is 4.66 years and the maximum time is 8.00 years with an average of 5.89 years of study. All calculations exclude leave times.
Disclaimer
Admissions data refer to all UBC Vancouver applications, offers, new registrants for each year, May to April [data updated: 12 July 2017]. Enrolment data are based on March 1 snapshots. Program completion data are only provided for datasets comprised of more than 4 individuals. Rates and times of completion depend on a number of variables (e.g. curriculum requirements, student funding), some of which may have changed in recent years for some programs [data updated: 8 April 2016].

Research Supervisors

This list shows faculty members with full supervisory privileges who are affiliated with this program. It is not a comprehensive list of all potential supervisors as faculty from other programs or faculty members without full supervisory privileges can request approvals to supervise graduate students in this program.

  • Ahmed, Rumee (Islam,Muslims,law,theology,Quran,Koran )
  • Bablitz, Leanne (Roman history, Roman law, Roman courtrooms, , Roman social history and law, Roman topography, Roman legal procedure)
  • Braund, Susan (Imperial Latin literature especially epic, Roman tragedy, Roman satire, panegyric, reception of Roman antiquity, translation studies, interface between literature, rhetoric and philosophy)
  • Chaudhry, Ayesha (Islam, Muslims, religion, gender, human rights, family and children, discrimination, social justice )
  • Cooper, Elisabeth (Archaeology of greater Mesopotamia)
  • Cousland, Robert (classical Greek mythology, Jewish-Hellenistic litereature, Greek mythology and religion, religion and comporary music, film and literature)
  • De Angelis, Franco (Ancient Greek world history, environment, urbanism, developmnet of societies, colonization, economics, ancient literature)
  • Fisher, Kevin (eastern Mediterranean archaeology (esp. prehistoric & Bronze Age Cyprus); spatial analysis of built environments and social interaction; urbanism and the social; dynamics of urban landscapes; place-making, monumentality and power; use of digital and spatial technologies in archaeology; emergence of complex societies; social theory; human and material agency; cultural heritage management; politics of the past)
  • Gardner, Gregg (Judaism, Rabbinic Literature, Rabbinic Judaism, Mishnah, Talmud, Jewish Studies, Jewish Law, Jewish Ethics, Charity, Jewish Ethics, Archaeology of Israel, Archaeology and Hebrew Bible, Archaeology of Jerusalemn )
  • Griffin, Michael (Greek philosophy, Ancient philosophy, Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Proclus, Neoplatonism, Ancient logic )
  • Marshall, Christopher Warren (Ancient Theatre and Stagecraft, Greek and Latin Poetry, Performance, translation, and adaptation, Classics and Popular Culture)
  • McCarty, Matthew (archaeology and art of the Roman Empire and Iron Age Europe/North Africa; ancient religion and ritual practice; interplays between texts, practices, and objects; imperialism, colonialism, and identity in the ancient world; interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, comparative (especially comparison with Qin/Han China), and theoretical approaches; historiography of archaeology)
  • McElduff, Siobhan (Ancient and modern translation, history of the book)
  • Menkis, Richard (Jews and Judaism in Canada Antisemitism in Canada Canada and the Holocaust Jewish historical memory and identity, Modern Jewish history, Canada, ethnicity and historical memory, religion and society, antisemitism, responses to the Holocaust)
  • Milstein, Sara (The Development of the Hebrew Bible; Mesopotamian Literature and Religion; Writing and Scribal Culture in the Ancient World; Israelite and Ancient Near Eastern Prophecy; Biblical and Mesopotamian Law)
  • Schneider, Thomas (Egyptian history and phonoly)
  • Yoon, Florence (heralds and the representation of the absent; anonymity and naming, particularly in Greek Tragedy; props and silent characters in Greek drama)

Recent Doctoral Citations

  • Dr. Jayne Elizabeth Knight
    "Dr. Knight studied the pragmatics of anger in Roman society during the late Republic and early Empire. She illustrated the complex relationship between anger and Roman politics. By focusing on how anger was employed in the professional contexts of the orator and emperor, she enhanced our understanding of the role of emotions in Roman public life." (November 2015)
  • Dr. Andrew Michael McClellan
    "Dr. McClellan's thesis examined the treatment of corpses in Latin epic poetry. He focused specifically on the motif of abuse in the post-Augustan epic. He shows that, encapsulated in the corpses and their treatment, the poems reveal an obsession with violence, horror and death that reflect the larger disturbed functioning of each poet's epic universe." (November 2015)
  • Dr. Tyson James Sukava
    "Dr. Sukava explored the development of anatomical terminology in classical Greece, and its mixed reception by non-medical authors. He offers the most complete assessment of classical Greek body terms to date, and contributes to our understanding of the dissemination of specialized medical knowledge in antiquity, from Homer to the 4th century BCE." (May 2015)
  • Dr. Kevin Bradley Solez
    "Dr. Solez contributed to the cultural history of ancient Greece. He demonstrated that banqueting or feasting was the ideal mode of cultural contact in the worldview of Greeks in the eighth and seventh centuries BCE. Multicultural banquets explain the continuities in Mediterranean banqueting-styles and other evidence of cultural exchange." (November 2014)
  • Dr. Karen Ann Aberle
    "Through studies of excavations and comparisons with Roman, Greek and Punic houses, Dr. Aberle demonstrated that Sicily did not just passively absorb ideas in the years 211-70 BC, but instead actively manipulated them. She challenged a prevailing opinion that Sicily has had little influence on Mediterranean culture and has contributed to our knowledge of Sicilian history." (November 2012)
 

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September 2018 Intake

Application Open Date
11 September 2017
Canadian Applicant Deadline
05 January 2018
International Applicant Deadline
05 January 2018

Program Information

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