Hamideh Bayrampour Basmenj

 
Prospective Graduate Students / Postdocs

This faculty member is currently not looking for graduate students or Postdoctoral Fellows. Please do not contact the faculty member with any such requests.

Associate Professor

Research Interests

Perinatal Period
Drugs and Pregnancy / Breast Feeding
Developmental Outcomes
Maternal Mental Health
Perinatal Anxiety
Pregnancy Outcomes
Prenatal Cannabis Use

Relevant Degree Programs

Affiliations to Research Centres, Institutes & Clusters

 
 

Biography

Poor mental health is common during pregnancy and is strongly associated with several adverse maternal and child outcomes with long term consequences such as postpartum depression, preterm birth, and developmental problems in offspring. Identification of pregnant women who have poor mental health or are at risk for developing these conditions is important, particularly as there is evidence that non-pharmacologic options are effective in their management during the antenatal period. My research has been focused on identifications of risk factors of transient and chronic maternal mental health as well as its trajectories over the perinatal period. I am also interested in conceptualization and measurement of maternal, screening and addressing poor maternal mental health. Pregnancy outcomes and labour interventions are other areas of my research interests.

Research Methodology

Mixed Methods Research
Systematic Reviews
Concept Analysis
Scale Development
cohort studies

Graduate Student Supervision

Master's Student Supervision

Theses completed in 2010 or later are listed below. Please note that there is a 6-12 month delay to add the latest theses.

Addressing anxiety and depression during pregnancy: primary antenatal care provider perspectives (2020)

This thesis presents an interpretive description of twelve primary antenatal care providers’ (PACP) attitudes and perspectives towards anxiety and depression (AD) during pregnancy.In British Columbia (BC), pregnant people (PP) can choose to be cared for throughout the perinatal period by a Family Physician (FP), Registered Midwife (RM), and/or Obstetrician-Gynecologist (ObGyn). Each profession operates under different mandates and care modalities. Thus, a purposive sample of twelve English-speaking PACPs (n=12) participated in one-on-one semi-structured interviews, including five FPs, four RMs, and three ObGyns. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed inductively using thematic analysis. Current practices in identifying and managing AD with PP, existing resources to support mental health during pregnancy, PACP’s perceived capacity to address AD during pregnancy, what could help address AD, and considerations for implementation in perinatal care settings are described. The knowledge constructed throughout interviews, analysis, and reporting portrays complex phenomena with significant implications for research, practice and policy.Anxiety and depression in the antenatal period are associated with short and long-term morbidity for PP and families. As the main and most constant point of contact with the healthcare system, PACPs are instrumental in shaping healthy pregnancy outcomes. With increasing calls to integrate mental health in perinatal care, this thesis explores and describes the perspectives of those on the frontline of care and offers insights to how we can improve responsiveness to needs. The latter focuses on organizational and system-level supports needed to facilitate the integration of mental health in perinatal care in the interest of healthy pregnancy outcomes.

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Publications

 
 

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