Annalee Yassi

Professor

Relevant Degree Programs

 

Graduate Student Supervision

Doctoral Student Supervision (Jan 2008 - May 2019)
Incidence and determinants of tuberculosis among healthcare workers in Free State, South Africa : a historical prospective cohort study and evaluation of infection control (2016)

Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at high-risk of exposure to tuberculosis (TB) at work, yet the incidence rate of TB disease among HCWs in South Africa, and other high-burden countries, is unknown. The effectiveness of TB infection control (IC) measures in South African hospitals remains unclear and evidence examining the relationship between IC and TB among HCWs is lacking. Objective 1: Estimate the incidence rate of TB among HCWs in Free State, South Africa from 2002-2012; andObjective 2: Examine the association between TB IC scores in Free State hospitals and the incidence of TB among HCWs in 2012. A record linkage was conducted to identify HCWs who were registered as TB patients. A historical prospective cohort study was conducted to obtain incidence rate ratios (IRR) of TB among HCWs in Free State from 2002-2012 and to compare patient characteristics. A mixed-effects poisson regression was used to model the association between facility type, occupation, duration of employment, and the rate of TB. A TB IC workplace assessment tool was used in 28 public hospitals. A generalized linear mixed-effects regression was used to assess the association between TB IC scores and incidence of TB among HCWs in 2012. There were 231,834 people diagnosed with TB in Free State from 2002-2012. Among HCWs, 2,677 cases of TB were diagnosed and 1,280 were expected. IRR ranged from 1.14 in 2012 to 3.12 in 2005. HCWs who were older, male, black, coloured and employed less than 20 years had higher risk of TB. There is a large variability in TB IC in Free State. As total IC score, environmental and personal protective equipment (PPE) score increased, the probability of TB among HCWs in that hospital decreased. This study objectively estimates the rate of TB among HCWs in South Africa. The findings confirm that HCWs are at high risk of TB - as much as three-times higher than the population they serve. These findings re-affirm that overall IC and PPE are essential to prevent HCWs from acquiring TB. More attention to TB IC is warranted to protect HCWs and to stop the TB epidemic.

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Integration of HIV Care into Primary Health Care: A Health System Approach in Free State South Africa (2015)

No abstract available.

Primary care, public health and the intersectoral management of health determinants : a realist inquiry (2014)

Problem: International bodies such as the World Health Organization call on nation-states to more adequately address health determinants (HD) and strengthen primary healthcare through intersectoral action for health (IAH). Despite many leaders expressing the desire to strengthen IAH, in many countries, practitioners and policy-makers struggle to succeed. This study aims to deepen the understanding of how to maximize the impact on health and HD through collaborations between primary care providers (PCP), public health professionals (PHP), and representatives of sectors other than the health sector (ROS). Method: This research includes a supplementary analysis of a mixed-methods case study on Cuban IAH to clarify and compare the roles of the various actors of interest (PCP, PHP, ROS) in managing HD, including the contexts, mechanisms, and outcomes (CMO) in which IAH occurs in Cuba when involving those particular actors. This is followed by a knowledge synthesis of IAH interventions internationally, providing a variety of different contexts, which enables systematic comparison of the various CMO configurations extracted from those interventions, following a method inspired by realist synthesis. Data for the final CMO analysis and demi-regularity are drawn from both the Cuban case study and the other examples of IAH from around the world that involved PCP, PHP, and ROS.Conclusions: IAH involving PHP, PCP, and ROS can lead to significant, positive health outcomes through the management of HD. A key context in which significant improvement in HD and health outcome occurs is when the IAH are carefully planned based on prior evidence and best practices related to partnership building and public health. Key mechanisms of those interventions include: 1) systematic attention to infrastructures, and activities that successfully increase social capital; 2) which in turn supports the negotiation of complementary and synergistic roles between PCP, PHP and ROS, and 3) using cycles of adjustment based on best practices of quality improvement which enable cumulative and reinforcing synergies over time (years and decades), as projects unfold in complex changing policy and practice environments, and as the multiple actors increase their social capital and experience in dealing with health determinants.

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Master's Student Supervision (2010 - 2018)
If you build it, will they be protected? : the evaluation of an occupational health and infection control capacity building program for healthcare workers in Free State, South Africa (2016)

Infection control and occupational health training among healthcare workers (HCWs) is insufficient in under-resourced systems. This is especially concerning in systems with high HIV and tuberculosis (TB) burdens where HCW exposure risk can be considerable. There is an urgent need to understand how to best develop and deliver effective capacity building programs for healthcare workers in these fields. This research examined a one-year certificate program in Free State, South Africa that aimed to empower HCWs to act as agents of change by building their capacity to conduct workplace-based HIV and TB prevention interventions. A mixed method approach was utilized. First, quantitative data were collected from self-reported Likert-style questionnaires administered to HCWs pre, mid, and post enrolment in the program. Questionnaire components included reactions to the program, and learning assessments (i.e., Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills, and Practices [KASPs]). Additionally, individual interviews, participant observations, and group project evaluations were used in the analysis. Questionnaire data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Interview data were thematically coded and analyzed based on the Kirkpatrick framework. Projects were descriptively analyzed. Participatory observations supplemented and contextualized these data. Participants (n=32) were mostly female (81%) nurses (56%). Findings from the questionnaires demonstrated that pre to post mean scores improved in Knowledge (+12%,Z=3.1,p=0.002) and Skills/Practices (+14%,Z=-3.1,p=0.002). Attitudes scores did not change. Interview data revealed that participants had been empowered and showed attitudinal improvements regarding HIV, TB, infection control and occupational health. Project evaluations, however, showed that participants had acquired only moderate-low proficiency in applying the subject matter to their interventions, although the projects did affect meaningful improvements in some workplaces. Participatory observations and interviews highlighted the resource-intensive nature of the program. Workplace training can strengthen HCWs’ occupational health and infection control KASPs. This capacity building initiative did result in the implementation of positive changes in workplaces, and empowered participants to be agents of change within their communities. However, the resources needed for this program, coupled with the low baseline skill levels of participants were challenges. When designing an intervention, baseline educational levels, institutional politics, sustainability, and resource effectiveness are important determinants of success.

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Stigma and confidentiality as barriers to uptake of HIV counseling and testing for health workers in 3 public hospitals in Free State province, South Africa : a mixed-methods study (2013)

Background: The HIV and AIDS epidemic has created a human resource crisis that “has replaced financial issues as the most serious obstacle to implementing national treatment plans” (WHO 2006a: 20). To retain the existing health workforce, international guidelines promote priority access to health services for health workers (HWs) through occupationally-based HIV counseling and testing (HCT) services. Such services have been implemented in South Africa (RSA), however recent evidence suggests their uptake is low.Objective: To identify barriers and facilitators to uptake of HCT services by HWs in three hospitals in Free State province, RSA. Methods: This mixed-methods study analyzed a portion of a self-administered survey and focus groups interviews (FGIs) to explore participants’ attitudes and behaviours related to HIV in the workplace, why HIV services may be underutilized and participants’ recommendations to improve the service.Results: In total, 978 HWs participated in the survey and 38 participated in the FGIs. Among survey respondents, 38.9% indicated a fear that confidentiality will not be maintained as the reason for not using OHS-based HIV services. 38.5% HWs perceive there is HIV stigma in the workplace. Six themes were identified from the FGIs, including location for testing, privacy, confidentiality, gossip, stigma and facilitators. FG participants perceived doctors’ and nurses’ experience with HIV in the workplace differs from other HWs, supported by multivariate analyses indicating patient-care HWs (PCHWs) have higher odds of perceiving confidentiality is not maintained in the OHS (adjusted ORs = 2.3; 95% CI 1.8-3.2) and perceiving HIV stigma in the workplace (adjusted OR = 2.4; 95% CI 1.8-3.2) when compared to non-PCHWs. FG participants also identified the need for in-service training on a range of topics related to HIV and expressed a desire to form HIV support groups to address negative attitudes toward HIV/AIDS in the workplace. Conclusions: Fear of breaches in confidentiality and HIV stigma were identified as the primary barriers to uptake of occupationally-based HCT by HWs. Overcoming these barriers require educating HWs on policies and guidelines that govern HIV in the workplace, implement measures to ensure confidentiality is maintained and addressing HIV stigma through stigma reduction interventions.

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