Katie Marshall

Assistant Professor

Research Classification

Research Interests

Environmental Change
Marine biodiversity
Population Ecology
invertebrates and temperature adaptation

Relevant Degree Programs

Affiliations to Research Centres, Institutes & Clusters

Research Options

I am available and interested in collaborations (e.g. clusters, grants).
I am interested in and conduct interdisciplinary research.
I am interested in working with undergraduate students on research projects.
 
 

Research Methodology

machine learning
bioinformatics
RNAseq
Enzymology

Recruitment

Doctoral students
2021
2022

Population variation in enzyme activity, metabolic rate

I support public scholarship, e.g. through the Public Scholars Initiative, and am available to supervise students and Postdocs interested in collaborating with external partners as part of their research.
I support experiential learning experiences, such as internships and work placements, for my graduate students and Postdocs.
I am open to hosting Visiting International Research Students (non-degree, up to 12 months).
I am interested in supervising students to conduct interdisciplinary research.

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Graduate Student Supervision

Master's Student Supervision (2010 - 2020)
Plasticity of cold-hardiness in the eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (2020)

Of all abiotic factors that drive range boundaries, temperature is the best studied because of its pervasive influence on biological processes. For populations at high-latitudes, extreme cold and the populations’ cold-hardiness set the range boundary. Phenotypic plasticity, where a single genotype results in differentiated phenotypes under differential environmental conditions, can assist populations in managing changing temperatures. Local adaptation in phenotypic plasticity, which results in different responses in different populations, can assist with the variability in temperature a species can experience across its range, especially at range boundaries. I used the eastern spruce budworm, Choristoneura fumiferana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) as a model system for exploring local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity of insect cold-hardiness. The species is one of the most destructive forest pests in North America, therefore accurately predicting its range and population growth is essential for management. In this thesis, I show that there is no transgenerational plasticity in cold-hardiness. However, I found a fitness cost associated with repeated cold exposures. Additionally, across the species’ range, I found both local adaptation of seasonal cold-hardiness and short-term plasticity of this trait. Therefore, the findings of this thesis provide evidence for including phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation when modelling species distributions under climate change.

View record

Publications

  • Thermal sensitivity at constant temperatures does not predict responses under varying temperatures (2017)
    INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY, 57, E337--E337
  • Bacteria eat first at the dinner table (2016)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 219 (1), 4--4
  • Biological impacts of thermal extremes: mechanisms and costs of functional responses matter (2016)
    Integrative and comparative biology, 56 (1), 73--84
  • Can we predict ectotherm responses to climate change using thermal performance curves and body temperatures? (2016)
    Ecology Letters, 19 (11), 1372--1385
  • Cold acclimation wholly reorganizes the Drosophila melanogaster transcriptome and metabolome (2016)
    Scientific Reports, 6
  • Diving beetles that handle heat better have bigger backyard (2016)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 219 (19), 2970--2970
  • Integrating the effects of repeated cold exposure from transcriptome to species distribution in the eastern spruce budworm (2016)
    INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY, 56, E138--E138
  • Life in the frequency domain: the biological impacts of changes in climate variability at multiple time scales (2016)
    Integrative and comparative biology, , icw024
  • Light-exposed moths can't find the flame (2016)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 219 (13), 1936--1936
  • Primed to fight: mom's meals make baby stronger (2016)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 219 (7), 910--910
  • Dateless bees wear better perfume (2015)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 218 (19), 2985--2985
  • Decreased competitive interactions drive a reverse species richness latitudinal gradient in subarctic forests (2015)
    Ecology, 96 (2), 461--470
  • NEW FAT FUELS FROZEN FLIES (2015)
    Journal of Student Science and Technology, 8 (1)
  • Seasonal swings match latitudinal shifts in shut down (2015)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 218 (7), 964--965
  • Sunbathing helps senior flies keep active (2015)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 218 (13), 1978--1979
  • The relative importance of number, duration and intensity of cold stress events in determining survival and energetics of an overwintering insect (2015)
    Functional Ecology, 29 (3), 357--366
  • UVB damages treefrog tadpole DNA (2015)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 218 (19), 2981--2982
  • Yeast's beery smell attracts fruit flies (2015)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 218 (2), 164--164
  • Acid defends ants against attack (2014)
  • Bug buddy builds biotin (2014)
  • Insect gears give great jumps (2014)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 217 (2), 160--161
  • Seasonal accumulation of acetylated triacylglycerols by a freeze-tolerant insect (2014)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 217 (9), 1580--1587
  • Stinky secretions for keeping clean (2014)
  • AHEAD OF THE GAME: HOW KNOCKED INSECTS STICK (2013)
  • ATTACK OF THE EXPLODING TERMITES (2013)
  • MONOGAMOUS QUEENS MEAN LAZY WORKERS (2013)
  • MUTANT MOSQUITOES REVEAL DEET'S DUAL ACTION (2013)
  • Real-time measurement of metabolic rate during freezing and thawing of the wood frog, Rana sylvatica: implications for overwinter energy use (2013)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 216 (2), 292--302
  • The goldenrod gall fly s liquid little secret: 3-acetyl-1, 2-diacyl-sn-glycerols are associated with natural survival of intracellular freezing in Eurosta solidaginis (2013)
    INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY, 53, E137--E137
  • The sub-lethal effects of repeated cold exposure in insects (2013)
  • Awards, Scholarships and Grants Awarded at the SICB Meeting in January 2012 (2012)
    Integrative and Comparative Biology, 52 (1), 1--2
  • Differences in tissue concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in the roots and cotyledons of annual and perennial species of flax (Linum) (2012)
    Botany, 90 (10), 1015--1027
  • Ecologically-relevant stresses hurt differently: the response of Eurosta solidaginis to repeated freeze-thaw cycles (2012)
    INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY, 52, E113--E113
  • FRUIT FLIES ON ICE (2012)
  • LIGHT AND CHEMICAL CUES TRIGGER BIBLICAL SWARMS (2012)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 215 (19), v--vi
  • Real-time measurements of metabolism during freezing and thawing in wood frogs, Rana sylvatica (2012)
    INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY, 52, E160--E160
  • The impacts of repeated cold exposure on insects (2012)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 215 (10), 1607--1613
  • Thermal Variability Increases the Impact of Autumnal Warming and Drives Metabolic Depression in an Overwintering Butterfly (2012)
    PLoS ONE, 7 (3), e34470
  • Threshold temperatures mediate the impact of reduced snow cover on overwintering freeze-tolerant caterpillars (2012)
    Naturwissenschaften, 99 (1), 33--41
  • WATER STRESS DOWN SOUTH (2012)
  • Basal cold but not heat tolerance constrains plasticity among Drosophila species (Diptera: Drosophilidae) (2011)
    Journal of evolutionary biology, 24 (9), 1927--1938
  • Divergent transcriptomic responses to repeated and single cold exposures in Drosophila melanogaster (2011)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 214 (23), 4021--4029
  • The effects of CO2 and chronic cold exposure on fecundity of female Drosophila melanogaster (2011)
    Journal of Insect Physiology, 57 (1), 35--37
  • The Evolution of Cold Tolerance inDrosophilaLarvae (2011)
    Physiological and Biochemical Zoology, 84 (1), 43--53
  • The impacts of repeated cold exposure in insects (2011)
    INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY, 51, E127--E127
  • The sub-lethal effects of repeated freezing in the woolly bear caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella (2011)
    Journal of Experimental Biology, 214 (7), 1205--1212
  • Triacylglyceride measurement in small quantities of homogenised insect tissue: comparisons and caveats (2011)
    Journal of insect physiology, 57 (12), 1602--1613
  • Rapid changes in desiccation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster are facilitated by changes in cuticular permeability (2010)
    Journal of Insect Physiology, 56 (12), 2006--2012
  • Repeated stress exposure results in a survival--reproduction trade-off in Drosophila melanogaster (2009)
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, , rspb20091807
  • The sublethal effects of multiple acute cold exposure: lessons from Drosophila (2009)
    INTEGRATIVE AND COMPARATIVE BIOLOGY, 49, E266--E266
 
 

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