Francis Lynn

Associate Professor

Research Interests

Diabetes
ß-cell development
ß-cell biology
Human pluripotent stem cells
CRISPR/Cas
transcriptional regulation

Relevant Degree Programs

 

Biography

Francis Lynn completed his PhD in Ray Pederson's laboratory at UBC where he became interested in beta cells, diabetes and gene regulation. Postdoctoral studies with Michael German in San Francisco piqued his interest in beta cell development and small RNA biology.

His group is interested in understanding the mechanisms that regulate the formation of islet β-cells from pancreatic stem or progenitor cells during solid organ formation. They focus on the gene regulatory networks at play in the progenitor cells and how these networks change during differentiation to mature endocrine cells and in the long-term maintenance of the β-cell. They believe that a greater understanding of these genetic mechanisms and pathways will refine cell-based approaches for preventing and reversing the β-cell deterioration and loss that occur with diabetes.

Recruitment

Doctoral students
Postdoctoral Fellows
Outstanding candidates can expect a full funding package offer
Any time / year round

Research in the Lynn lab is targeted at understanding the insulin-producing pancreatic β-cell, how it fails during diabetes mellitus and how we can make surrogate cells to cure diabetes. We use a variety of models to study the regulatory pathways important for embryonic β-cell genesis and function.

The current focus of research in the lab is understanding how DNA-binding transcription factors regulate β-cell formation and function, how they are reguated post-translationally and how they prevent β-cell dysfunction and diabetes.

We currently have positions available for graduate students and postdoctoral scholars interested in studying the regulation of pancreatic β-cell development and function. Please contact me personally by e-mail with a cover letter outlining your interests, why you would like to join my lab, and please include your vita. Experience in cell and developmental biology, molecular biology or stem cell biology is preferred. More important are curiosity and passion about stem and developmental biology, and a talent for independent research, supported by a strong publication record.

Graduate Student Supervision

Publications

 

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