Charlyn Black

 
Prospective Graduate Students / Postdocs

This faculty member is currently not actively recruiting graduate students or Postdoctoral Fellows, but might consider co-supervision together with another faculty member.

Professor

Research Classification

Health Care Organization
Health Information Systems

Research Interests

Health services research
Quality, effectiveness and outcomes of health care
Health information systems
Research and policy
Knowledge translation
Population health

Relevant Degree Programs

 

Research Methodology

Administrative and other existing data sets
Linked data
Measurement
Mixed Methods Research

Graduate Student Supervision

Doctoral Student Supervision (Jan 2008 - May 2019)
A population-based analysis of the risk of hip fracture in men with prostate cancer exposed to radiation and androgen deprivation therapy (2008)

Prostate cancer is frequently diagnosed in elderly men and, despite the largely unproven survival benefits of treatment, the majority receive treatment. Treatment options include surgery, radiation, and/or androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Risks associated with treatment include hip fracture. Current understanding suggests that hip fracture is a frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly, and both radiation treatment and ADT can increase the risk of hip fracture. It is important to understand these risks so they can be minimized and the morbidity of treatment reduced.The objectives of this study were to estimate the risk of hip fracture as a major adverse outcome of treatment for prostate cancer among elderly men. The specific objectives include estimating: 1) the risk of hip fracture and the dose-risk relationship among patients receiving curative radiation treatment, and 2) the risk of hip fracture associated with palliative ADT and relapsed ADT compared to curative ADT.The cancer diagnosis and treatment records of 32,673 men were linked to their hospital discharge abstracts. The risk of hip fracture was estimated using Cox regression and the estimates were adjusted for age, comorbidity, income, and year of diagnosis.The risk of hip fracture was 59% higher among men who received curative radiation when compared to men who received curative surgery. The risk of hip fracture fell by 6% with each one Gy increase in radiation dose between 55 and 81 Gy Biological Equivalent Dose to the hip-bone. The risk of hip fracture for subjects in the palliative ADT and relapsed ADT categories was 5.98 and 5.77 times the risk in comparison to men who received curative ADT treatment.Curative radiation treatment is associated with an increased risk of hip fracture when compared to curative surgery. The risk of hip fracture is greater with ADT for palliation and relapsed cancer than with curative treatment. Current treatments for prostate cancer contain significant risk of hip fracture for elderly men and these risks should be considered as part of the treatment decision.

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Master's Student Supervision (2010 - 2018)
Examining the delivery of mental health services in primary care and public health collaborations using a population health framework (2017)

Background: More than 6.7 million people in Canada experience a mental illness during a one-year period. Mental illnesses are highly influenced by the determinants of health, which are the social, economic, and physical environments that contribute to an individual’s health status. Addressing mental illnesses requires a population health approach involving joint action across multiple sectors to focus on the determinants of health. This thesis examines the extent to which Primary Care (PC) and Public Health (PH) collaborations incorporated a population health approach to address mental illnesses. Methods: A secondary analysis of data collected through a multi-province (British Columbia, Ontario, Nova Scotia) study that examined factors related to strengthening primary health care through PC and PH collaboration was conducted. Focus group data from four cases of PC-PH collaborations that addressed mental health were used to examine whether mental health activities incorporated a population health approach, as well as to identify the enablers and barriers to carrying out the activities. A qualitative descriptive approach and thematic analysis were used. A coding framework and themes were developed deductively, based on the Public Health Agency of Canada’s population health framework, and through inductive analysis. Results: Twenty-nine themes and eighteen subthemes were identified that correspond to the Public Health Agency of Canada’s population health framework. Key enablers included working in a multidisciplinary team, addressing the determinants of health, and engaging the community. Key barriers were poor data systems, a lack of service integration, and a lack of action on demonstrating accountability for outcomes. Conclusions: Findings highlighted the relevance of a population health approach and demonstrate that certain aspects of the population health framework are more actionable than others in the area of mental health, thus identifying areas for the framework’s further development. The research also identifies enablers and barriers to conducting mental health activities, offering guidance on how to facilitate population health implementation. The results could help provide insight at the program and policy levels for PC and PH as well as other sectors related to collaborative strategies that could strengthen the delivery of mental health services by incorporating a population health approach.

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