Philipp Kreyenmeier

 
Eye and Hand Coordination
Miriam Spering
Herford
Germany
 

Why did you decide to pursue a graduate degree?

The neural mechanisms that underlie our visual perception, the control of eye and hand movements have fascinated me for a long time. Although our brain transforms visual information into precise motor commands in many everyday tasks and seems to do so effortlessly, the underlying processes are complex and not yet fully understood yet. During my undergrad work, I discovered my fascination for visual and motor neuroscience research. I am now pursuing my PhD to follow my passion for neuroscience research.

Why did you decide to study at UBC?

During my undergrad, I already worked with my supervisor and found Dr. Spering's laboratory, and UBC in general, to be an excellent and innovative research environment.

What is it specifically, that your program offers, that attracted you?

UBC's Neuroscience program provides a large cross-disciplinary network of outstanding researchers working in different fields of neuroscience (ranging from molecular to systems neuroscience, as well as research in healthy and clinical populations). I thus hope to collaborate with different researchers during my PhD and to be inspired by excellent researchers working in different fields of neuroscience.

What was the best surprise about UBC or life in Vancouver?

The great amount and diversity of outdoor activities Vancouver offers: running around Stanley Park, biking along the seawall, or hiking in the mountains. There is always something to do!

What aspects of your life or career before now have best prepared you for your UBC graduate program?

I had to really learn not to stress myself out too much. Not always taking everything so serious and keeping calm in stressful times has helped me to stay focussed, finding solutions, and to work more independently.

What advice do you have for new graduate students?

Find something relaxing to do for times when grad school becomes stressful and frustrating.