Ellen Jopling

The Department of Psychology at UBC is highly regarded internationally with an excellent clinical training program, and I knew I wanted to pursue my graduate work at UBC after meeting my current supervisor.
Why did you decide to pursue a graduate degree?

I am deeply committed to doing what I can to improve the wellbeing of those at risk of developing depression, or those who already struggle with depression. Given how many unanswered questions there are in this field, pursuing a doctoral degree means that I am able to answer a few of those questions. By contributing to this field, I hope to be able to improve our understanding of the factors related to the development, maintenance, and recurrence of depression.

Why did you decide to study at UBC?

I knew I wanted to pursue my graduate work at UBC after meeting my current supervisor, Dr. Joelle LeMoult. Dr. LeMoult is both an incredible researcher and an outstanding mentor. I feel very lucky to be completing my doctoral work under her supervision.

What is it specifically, that your program offers, that attracted you?

The Department of Psychology at UBC is highly regarded internationally and has an excellent clinical training program. Further, the clinical program has a very strong research focus, which fits well with my career goals.

What was the best surprise about UBC or life in Vancouver?

Even though I was born and raised in Vancouver, I never realized that UBC is essentially inside a forest. Which is super cool.

What aspects of your life or career before now have best prepared you for your UBC graduate program?

Working with Dr. Tom Hollenstein at Queen's University during my undergraduate degree sparked my interest in the work I'm doing now and allowed me to develop the core research skills that I rely on to conduct impactful research. Further, working as a clinical research assistant in several hospitals across Canada motivated me to provide the best treatment I can to youth and their families.

What do you like to do for fun or relaxation?

Hike and camp!

What advice do you have for new graduate students?

A very wise mentor once told me that a graduate program is like a gas; it will take up the space you give it. So, you have to set boundaries. For me, this meant carving out a solid routine and a work-life balance early on in the program.

 
 
 

Learn about our faculties, research, and more than 300 programs in our 2021 Graduate Viewbook!