Graduate Support Initiative (GSI) Awards

Quick Facts

The Graduate Support Initiative is a program for funding graduate students through entrance scholarships, multi-year funding packages, tuition awards and scholarship top-ups. GSI funding cannot be used as payment for employment; nor will it replace funding for TA-ships. Approximately $6.5 million in GSI funding is awarded each year across all UBC graduate programs.

Annual Value: 
various
Award Status: 
Active
Deadline: 

Likely in January 2011

Eligibility

Students who are enrolled in the following degree programs are eligible for the Graduate Support Initiative:

  • PhD
  • DMA
  • All master's degrees, except full cost-recovery programs (in cases of ambiguity, the Provost will determine those programs that are ineligible on this basis)

GSI funding is available to both international and domestic students.

Citizenship: 
Canadian
Citizenship: 
Permanent Resident
Citizenship: 
International
Degree Level: 
Masters
Degree Level: 
Doctoral
Applicant Status: 
Incoming Students
Applicant Status: 
Continuing Students

Procedures

Application Procedures: 

GSI allocations are made to disciplinary Faculties, who in turn allocate those funds amongst their graduate programs. Faculties and graduate programs are to establish and publish criteria by which the GSI funding will be distributed amongst their graduate students. Students should refer questions regarding funding criteria and amounts to their graduate program or Faculty.

Further Information

GSI allocation formula

Taking the November registration data for each of the last three years, each registered student "earns" the following weighting for their disciplinary Faculty:

  • PhD:  4
  • Master's with thesis:  2
  • Course-based Master's:  1
  • High cost-recovery Master's:  0

Each Faculty's share of the total student registration determines the Faculty's share of the total GSI $ allocation.

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