My research explores the changing relationship of post secondary institutions in providing support, skills and preparation for successsful transitions for international students interested in migrating to Canada.

 
Richmond
Canada
UBC Public Scholars Award
 

Research Description

My research explores the changing relationship of post secondary institutions in providing support, skills and preparation for successsful transitions for international students interested in migrating to Canada. The objective is to engage international education practioners and other stakeholders in a broader discussion of their strategies and practice with respect to international students and to disseminate the linkages between higher education policy and immigration policy in Canada. Since the focus of my research is interdisciplinary, I wish to introduce the theory and frameworks used in political science to reframe issues of international student support through an immigration theory lens. The next step will be to engage practioner's in discussions about how this reframing might influence their current practice of international student support. This will be achieved through conference presentations, workshops and the development of a practioner's guide.

What does being a Public Scholar mean to you?

As a Public Scholar I am able to both link my work back to my practice in the field of International Education and also disseminate my research in ways that are concrete and meaningful to the sector as a whole.

In what ways do you think the PhD experience can be re-imagined with the Public Scholars Initiative?

The PSI provides acknowledgment that the skills and expertise developed in a PhD program can have important benefits beyond traditional research career pathways and gives voice, opportunity and recognition to scholars that wish to engage outside of traditional academic venues. This opens up huge opportunities for academic work to find relevance and connection to new people, groups and the public at large.

How do you envision connecting your PhD work with broader career possibilities?

The support of the PSI will allow me to disseminate my research in ways that translate best to those it can most benefit. I believe this will also allow me to highlight the skills I have gained while doing my doctoral studies and position me well for future roles and employment. It offers me the opportunity to expand my research and professional profile and contacts.

How does your research engage with the larger community and social partners?

As an interdisciplinary scholar, I believe I can provide a different perspective on issues related to international students and their migration pathways and the evolving relationship of the higher education institutions to international student mobilities. By engaging directly with practitioners in the field of international education, I hope to influence what is considered ethical practice and use the work I have done to better inform policy making at not only the institutional level, but provincial and national levels as well.

How do you hope your work can make a contribution to the “public good”?

By translating and disseminating my research beyond traditional academia, I hope to inform and influence policy makers and practitioners who recruit and support international students. When we are able to harness the abilities of those who wish to make a contribution to Canadian society I believe that contributes positively to the "public good."

Why did you decide to pursue a graduate degree?

After a career in higher education and international education I began looking at my work and practice and asking myself questions. I became interested in understanding the evolution of policy making and how and who influences change. I decided to pursue a graduate degree to get the answers and to reimagine my work where I could positively inform policymakers.

Why did you choose to come to British Columbia and study at UBC?

UBC provides me with the ability to pursue a customized, interdisciplinary approach to my research interests. They are welcoming of non-traditional doctoral students and they have rich and varied research and professional development programming that greatly augments the PhD experience. The campus and its people inspire me and I could not think of a better place to pursue my studies.

 

As a Public Scholar I am able to both link my work back to my practice in the field of International Education and also disseminate my research in ways that are concrete and meaningful to the sector as a whole.