Valentina Rutigliano

 
Corporate Finance and Labor Economics
 
The ocean and the mountains [...] give Vancouver a sense of peacefulness, even as a major city in Canada. I think this makes UBC a great place to focus on research.
Why did you decide to pursue a graduate degree?

As my undergraduate degree came to an end, I realized that I still knew so little about my field. Naturally, I thought that a graduate degree was all it would take to become an actual expert. That was unfortunately very naïve, but things turned out well: the deeper I delve into research, the more my interest grows.

Why did you decide to study at UBC?

I initially came to UBC as an exchange student in the final year of my undergraduate degree. During those four months, I took courses outside of my major, met amazing people from very different backgrounds, and discovered the natural wonders of BC. I went back home to finish my degree (a bit reluctantly, I have to admit), but I already knew that I wanted to come back for grad school. I was admitted to the MSc program in Finance and ended up transferring to the PhD program. I cannot seem to get enough of UBC!

What is it specifically, that your program offers, that attracted you?

The Finance Group at Sauder has leading scholars in the field, and my research interests align very well with those of several faculty members. The program’s outstanding reputation, both in Canada and abroad, was also a crucial factor.

What was the best surprise about UBC or life in Vancouver?

Living so close to the ocean and the mountains still amazes me. They give Vancouver a sense of peacefulness, even as a major city in Canada. I think this makes UBC a great place to focus on research.

What aspects of your life or career before now have best prepared you for your UBC graduate program?

Starting out as a MSc student in my department gave me exposure to the research environment and to what the experience as a PhD student would be like.

What advice do you have for new graduate students?

Writing a dissertation is a daunting task. The process is not only intellectually challenging but also very unstructured. So we sometimes feel guilty about taking well-deserved breaks, or to the contrary we give in to nasty procrastination patterns caused by the fear of failure. I try to break big projects into smaller tasks and set realistic deadline for each mini-milestone – then focus on just one at a time.

 
 
 

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