Daniel He

UBC graduate student Daniel He
 
Identification of blood-based biomarkers to distinguish subtypes of interstitial lung disease
Vancouver
Canada
 

Why did you decide to pursue a graduate degree?

I really enjoy data science and decided to combine those interests with my background in biological sciences. Data is starting to shape our society in a variety of ways, and I want to learn how to use it to improve our world in a positive manner - in this case, trying to solve complex human diseases!

Why did you decide to study at UBC?

UBC is a world leader in medicine. We have strong collaborations between our physicians and research scientists that allow for access to important patient samples and ensure the relevance of our biomedical research.

Remember to prioritize your mental health, and don't compare yourself to others - we are all on our own journey. Think big with your research, but plan for the future while you're in graduate school!

What is it specifically, that your program offers, that attracted you?

I have previously completed a Master of Science in Experimental Medicine, so I was quite familiar with the program. Attending my department's research day opens my eyes to the wide variety of research within the program, which is what I like most about it in addition to the freedom we are given to pursue our research interests.

What was the best surprise about UBC or life in Vancouver?

I have lived in Vancouver my entire life, but I am constantly discovering new things about it thanks to the diverse group of students and staff at UBC. Someone who works on campus once took me up to the top of the Iona Building - wow, what a view!

What aspects of your life or career before now have best prepared you for your UBC graduate program?

I've done an undergraduate and a master's degree at UBC, and I've also worked in a UBC research lab. Being in these environments and learning about different expertise within our community has enabled me to create collaborations of my own, which is the key to performing successful research.

What advice do you have for new graduate students?

Remember to prioritize your mental health, and don't compare yourself to others - we are all on our own journey. Think big with your research, but plan for the future while you're in graduate school!