(Re)Searching for Social Justice

Date & Time

Wednesday, 12 April 2017
18:30 to 20:30

Location

Alma VanDusen Room, Vancouver Public Library, 350 West Georgia Street

Offered by

Public Scholars Initiative

Registration Closed / Past Event

 
 

How can rigorous research help us advance the concept and practice of social justice? In the fourth event of the 2017 PhDs Go Public Research Talk Series, join us as eight doctoral students from the Public Scholars Initiative have seven minutes each to talk about their research on, and search for, social justice.

Date & Time: Wednesday, 12 April 2017; 6:30-8:30pm

Location: Alma VanDusen Room, Vancouver Public Library, 350 West Georgia Street

RSVP: https://survey.ubc.ca/s/2017_PhDsGoPublic_4/

 

Speakers
Emma Feltes (Anthropology) works in partnership with Indigenous activists to delve into the history of the "Constitution Express"—a movement in the 1980s to assert Indigenous rights, nationhood, and self-determination during the patriation of Canada’s Constitution— with a view to inform our relations today.

Jocelyn Fraser (Mining Engineering) focuses on social risk and social responsibility in the international mining sector with a particular focus in Arequipa, Peru, where she investigates ways how mining companies can collaborate with communities to deliver tangible social benefits.

Maggie Low (IRES) collaborates with the Heiltsuk Nation in Bella Bella, BC, to investigate the implementation of a large scale land use agreement between Coastal First Nations and the BC government, as well the implications of the agreement for Indigenous well-being and governance.

Kyle Loewen (Geography) partners with labour communities in the US who are employed in "last-mile" delivery—the distance between retailer warehouses and a consumer's home—to address labour-related issues and improve working conditions in this sector.  

 

Jeremy Stone (Planning) collaborates with urban community organisations in Vancouver and New Orleans to explore gentrification practices in these cities from a multidisciplinary perspective, and seeks to increase the resilience of neighborhoods in the face of catastrophic change.
Yemi Adeyeye (Forestry) collaborates with Natura Foundation Bolivia to explore the issues of participation, knowledge production and roles of different actors in the development of an indigenous-driven environmental intervention in Bolivia.
Alicia Luedke (Political Science) investigates the impact of global policies seeking to prevent and prohibit the use of sexual violence in war on armed group practices of rape and other-related offenses in conflict situations.
Sarah Fessenden (Anthropology) teams up with "Food Not Bombs" activists to understand and address commercial food-waste in the face of hunger; she works closely with donors and anti-hunger activists to find empowering ways of getting otherwise wasted food to people in need.